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Seriously, Stop Bullying People Who Won’t Vote for Hillary

Tuesday, October 4, 2016 8:55
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(Before It's News)

Journalist Ted Rall explains to friends and readers why he just can’t stomach voting for Hillary Clinton in the upcoming election; we live in the illusion of democracy, not the actual thing; meanwhile, skeletons discovered in Roman ruins in England raise questions about human history. These discoveries and more below.

7 Reasons I Won’t Vote for Hillary Clinton
To my many friends and readers who plan to vote for Hillary Clinton: please stop bullying me.

The Internet Finally Belongs to Everyone
The United States no longer controls the address book for the Internet.

Tales of the Scumerati: ‘What’s the Most Obscene Display of Private Wealth You’ve Ever Witnessed?’
We know the rich are getting richer in the United States. And, as it turns out, people are well aware of how rich people are flaunting their growing wealth.

America Approaching a Period of Disintegration
Anthropologist Peter Turchin’s “Ages of Discord” provides a crucial decoder ring for Trump-era social strife.

Living in the Illusion of Democracy
This year, 76% of voters want four-candidates in the debates.

U.S. Military Is Building a $100 Million Drone Base in Africa
While AFRICOM failed to respond to requests for information about the projects, a May 2016 satellite photo of the site provides a status report.

Hillary Clinton and Our Moribund Democracy
Unless the nation lapses into lunacy on November 8, Hillary Clinton will be our next president. The prospect raises an alarming question we’ve never before confronted.

What About Asian American diversity on Broadway?
Hamilton has been hailed as the start of a new, less white era on Broadway, but many remain underrepresented onstage. As Asian-American actors celebrate progress, they also reveal the stark realities that prove how far theater still has to go.

What the FBI Files Reveal About Hillary Clinton’s Email Server
New documents tell the full, strange story of a technophobic VIP, a sloppy State Department, and the jerry-rigged computer that held it all together.

As Brazil’s New Ruler Admits Lie Behind Impeachment, U.S, Press Closes Eyes
In a September 22 speech to an elite foreign policy group in New York City, Brazil’s legislatively installed president, Michel Temer, made the startling admission that President Dilma Rousseff was removed from office because of her position on economic policy, rather than any alleged wrongdoing on her part.

What All Those Trees Planted in Israel Were Covering
Saffuriya was one of more than 500 Palestinian villages ethnically cleansed by Israel in 1948, during the Nakba. In this short video, filmed during one of his tours of Saffuriya, journalist Jonathan Cook explains how Israel acted quickly to raze these villages so the 750,000 refugees could not return and then covered up these war crimes by planting forests over the ruins.

How an Old Hacking Law Hampers the Fight Against Online Discrimination
In earlier years, Internet forecasts called for sunshine—access to knowledge, popular democracy, a flatter and fairer world. But, over time, the Web has revealed itself to be no freer of discrimination than the physical world it inhabits.

Mexico: Resist to Exist
If 42 is the number of life, perhaps 43 is the number of life lived on through others. Mexicans are now chanting “Ayotzi lives, the struggle goes on” as they mark two years since the 43 teacher-students in Ayotzinapa were disappeared.

When Roman ‘Barbarians’ Met the Asian Enlightenment
The BBC recently announced the discovery of two “ethnically Chinese” skeletons at an ancient Roman burial site in England. Who were they? What drove them to the far end of the world? We don’t know, yet.

Police Officer Who Killed Terence Crutcher Says She Shot Him Because She Was Temporarily Deaf
Officer Betty Shelby is being charged with first-degree manslaughter in the shooting death of unarmed Terence Crutcher, whose car was stalled in the middle of a Tulsa road.

Contract Expiration to End U.S. Authority Over Internet IP Addresses
Forty-seven years of U.S. government authority over the Internet’s most basic functions is slated to end Saturday, not with a celebration or a wake but with the quiet expiration of a contract.

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