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Does Google Help Students Learn (or Just Think They Do?)

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 8:01
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(Before It's News)

Written By: Janet Anthony for TWB

Google Search is the best friend of most of us nowadays. Anything that we need to know is typed in the search engine bar, and it comes to us as in a sort of miracle. It has become such a common thing that we even turned it into a verb. We don’t search online anymore; we simply google it. When it comes to the classroom, the scenario is no different. Students are relying on Google to do their assignments, find lists of the best writing services, and do their homework from very early age. And they are being encouraged by their parents and teachers to do so.

But what we don’t know is how beneficial it can be to their learning process. Maybe finding answers so easily has damaged our ability to memorize things and to explore our own ideas and imagination?

Scientists are concerned by the consequences

A study by the psychologists Nicholaus S. Noles and Judith H. Danovitch at the University of Louisville is one of many trying to determine the impact of searching for answers online might have on our future intellectual development. According to it, 4-5-year-old children are still very keen on asking questions to adults. But the situation changes when they turn 8 years old when the computers become more exciting to them.

Still even 8 years old children will rely on computers to solve their doubts less often than adults. The alarming conclusion though was that 5-8 years old children would primarily believe in an answer from a computer if it conflicts with what an adult says. And considering that not all that you can find online is entirely true neither safe, it can turn into something highly dangerous.

Adrian F. Ward of the University of Colorado and Matthew Fisher of Yale University have also found in their experiments that people tend to think that they have better answers, and even a higher understanding of facts just because they have found it online. In other words, the internet is working as an ego booster of some kind independent of its accuracy. [Click to continue]

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