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Can Congress Be Stopped From Ratifying The Electoral College Vote Count For 2012 Presidential Election?

Thursday, November 22, 2012 15:31
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(Before It's News)

There is a movement afoot to stop CONGRESS from ratifying the Electoral College
vote count, if Congress refused to ratify the count it would prevent Obama from
being sworn in for a second term as President.


Reports that thousands of Military
votes
went missing and were not counted coupled with numerous reports of
voter fraud has precipitated this movement.

Related: U.S. News

Foiling the Electoral College Process
What is the Electoral
College?

The Electoral College is a process, not a place. The
founding fathers established it in the Constitution
as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and
election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens.
The Electoral College process consists of the selection of the electors, the meeting of the electors where they vote for President
and Vice President, and the counting of the electoral votes by Congress.
The Electoral College consists of 538 electors. A majority
of 270 electoral votes is required to elect the President. Your state’s
entitled allotment of electors equals the number of members in its
Congressional delegation: one for each member in the House of Representatives
plus two for your Senators. Read more about the allocation of electoral votes.
Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated
3 electors and treated like a state for purposes of the Electoral College. For
this reason, in the following discussion, the word “state” also refers to the
District of Columbia.
Each candidate running for President in your state has his
or her own group of electors. The electors are generally chosen by the
candidate’s political party, but state laws vary on how the electors are selected and what their responsibilities are. Read more about the qualifications of the Electors and restrictions on who the Electors may vote for.
The presidential election is held every four years on the
Tuesday after the first Monday in November. You help choose your state’s
electors when you vote for President because when you vote for your candidate
you are actually voting for your candidate’s electors.
Most states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all
electors to the winning presidential candidate. However, Maine and Nebraska
each have a variation of “proportional representation.” Read more about the allocation of Electors among the states and try to predict the outcome of the Electoral College vote.
After the presidential election, your governor prepares a
“Certificate of Ascertainment” listing all of the candidates who ran for
President in your state along with the names of their respective electors. The
Certificate of Ascertainment also declares the winning presidential candidate
in your state and shows which electors will represent your state at the meeting
of the electors in December of the election year. Your state’s Certificates of
Ascertainments are sent to the Congress and the National Archives as part of
the official records of the presidential election. See the key dates for the 2012 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state
officials
, the Office of the Federal Register and the
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
, and the Congress
in the Electoral College process.
The meeting of the electors takes place on the first Monday
after the second Wednesday in December after the presidential election. The
electors meet in their respective states, where they cast their votes for
President and Vice President on separate ballots. Your state’s electors’ votes
are recorded on a “Certificate of Vote,” which is prepared at the meeting by the
electors. Your state’s Certificates of Votes are sent to the Congress and the
National Archives as part of the official records of the presidential election.
See the key dates for the 2012 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state
officials
and the Congress
in the Electoral College process.
Each state’s electoral votes are counted in a joint session
of Congress on the 6th of January in the year following the meeting of the
electors. Members of the House and Senate meet in the House chamber to conduct
the official tally of electoral votes. See the key dates for the 2012 election and information about the role and responsibilities of Congress
in the Electoral College process.
The Vice President, as President of the Senate, presides
over the count and announces the results of the vote. The President of the
Senate then declares which persons, if any, have been elected President and
Vice President of the United States.

The President-Elect takes the oath of office and
is sworn in as President of the United States on January 20th in the year
following the Presidential election.

Learn about the
Electors
·       
Who selects the Electors?
Roles and
Responsibilities in the Electoral College Process
The Office of the Federal Register coordinates the functions of the Electoral College on
behalf of the Archivist of the United States, the States, the Congress, and the
American People. The Office of the Federal Register operates as an intermediary
between the governors and secretaries of state of the States and the Congress.
It also acts as a trusted agent of the Congress in the sense that it is
responsible for reviewing the legal sufficiency of the certificates before the
House and Senate accept them as evidence of official State action.


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Total 5 comments
  • Of course it will be ratified. Are Bush/Cheney going to prison for obvious war crimes; of course not. Don’t ask silly questions.

    • They’d have to find something wrong with Obama’s identity but they’re not asking.
      No one’s vetting Obama. because he’s black: it would be racist to ask him for his papers like a vulgar black pulled over for an ID Check like back in the slavery days. That’s over now. Being black is enough to not ever be put in accusation any more EVER.

  • go do your jobs and get this lying cheating son of a donkey out of power…..step one next start holding all political crimes as real crimes and putting the criminals in jail.

  • “…thousand of military votes…” Big f’ing deal.The military voted for Obama far and above Romney because they’d rather not be shipped off to another war for the bankers or oilmen. They aren’t stupid.

  • Why do people even vote…would those same people keep going back to Vegas if they lost every time out ???

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