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Blacks Running from Trump Not Wanted in Africa

Saturday, November 19, 2016 7:33
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(Before It's News)

http://google.com/safebrowsing/diagnostic?tpl=safari&site=theblacksphere.net&hl=en-us The election of Donald Trump won’t create the mass exodus of “African-Americans” to Africa. But for those who might want to go, they should know they are not welcome.

As it turns out, African countries don’t want blacks running from Trump, as this woman in the video points out.

“Don’t come over here… we don’t have food stamps here… you’re going to work!”

Africans are not as fond of American blacks as “African-Americans” seem to believe. This woman appears majorly pissed by the thought of people running away from America.

And her views are not anecdotal. Various black families that have moved to Africa are seen as outsiders. Unless you are a missionary or on the lam, why would you leave the greatest country in the world.

The woman says, “saying ‘back to Africa’ is insulting…You were never from here!”

And she’s right.

The overwhelming majority of blacks in America has NO connection with Africa, except one that allows them to employ racism. Yes, blacks were once slaves, in case you missed that.

But that connection is lost on true Africans, who see American blacks very differently.

Northwestern University wrote this of the chasm between Africans and black Americans:

Girmai Lemma is from Ethiopia. He has lived in Chicago for many years. He does not consider himself to be African-American: He is African.

Lemma is not alone. Constant tensions between African-Americans and non U.S.-born Africans refute the notion that the term African-American is interchangeable with black.  In the eyes of many native-born blacks and African immigrants, it isn’t.

“It would have been nice if we had a good relationship with African-Americans, but we don’t,” Lemma said.

How Lemma defines himself may be irrelevant to the larger American society.

But within the black community, less than 2 percent are Africans. Lemma said that in the United States all black people are put in the same group. “When we came from Ethiopia, we never thought we would be discriminated here,” Lemma said.

“[The police] follow you all the way until your house. It is a suburb, not too many blacks living there,” Lemma said. “When they see you, what is black is black, until they hear your accent.”

What Lemma is saying is that American blacks put the target on the backs of ALL black people. Africans immigrate to America for freedom from oppression, only to find that American blacks have made that very difficult.

The article continues,

While that might make police look favorably on African immigrants, it also cuts the other way.

Eugene Peba, originally from Nigeria, believes his accent causes African-Americans look down upon him.

“We don’t sound like they sound,” Peba said. “It is a little bit weird. We think that they would say, ‘This is my brother,’ but there is a little bit of resentment.”

In Face2Face Africa, the chasm is discussed further:

The cultural division between African Americans and Africans is not hard to miss. There are certain stereotypes across both groups that hinder the unity or peace among the two. Words like “African booty scratcher,” “uncivilized,” “poor,” “unclean,” and phrases like “they think they are better than us” are all metaphors that I have heard to describe Africans by some (not all) African Americans.

Africans believe that blacks in America perceive Africans as described above. Most Africans that come to America are highly educated, and see blacks as having squandered their opportunity in this country. The article goes on to suggest,

From some Africans, I have heard the words; “lazy,” “shiftless,” and phrases like “they don’t value education or family” to describe African Americans. Now a lot of times because there is no dialogue between the two groups, stereotypes and misconceptions generated by the media take shape. There are many reasons that contribute to this division, some of which are negative depictions in the media, historical detachment, and the downplay or omission of African achievements throughout history.

So for blacks who think salvation lies in The Motherland, I suggest they think again. There are millions of Africans ready and willing to replace every American black. And honestly, America would be better should that happen.

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