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Did Trump really say he won’t prosecute Hillary Clinton?

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 9:09
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(Before It's News)

It’s all over the MSM, that is, the Fake Media, that President-elect Donald Trump signaled he would not prosecute Hillary Clinton for her many crimes and misdemeanors, including her use of an unsecured email server when she was Obama’s secretary of state which jeopardized national security because of countless classified emails that were top-secret.

But is that true?

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 20: A Florida delegate holds up a sign that reads

The source of Trump allegedly not seeking criminal prosecution against Hillary comes from a sit-down interview he had yesterday, Nov. 22, 2016, with a group from the New York Times — the openly pro-Hillary paper, 17% of which is owned by Mexican mogul Carlos Slim, which declared journalists should abandon objectivity in their coverage of Trump.

See “NYT openly advocates abandoning objectivity in reporting on Trump” and “NYT calls on Google to hide Hillary Clinton’s failing health”.

The group was comprised of NYT publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., editors, reporters and op/ed columnists.

Here’s the relevant part of the interview:

MAGGIE HABERMAN, political reporter: I’ll start, thank you, Dean. Mr. President, I’d like to thank you for being here. This morning, [Trump’s spokeswoman] Kellyanne Conway talked about not prosecuting Hillary Clinton. We were hoping you could talk about exactly what that means — does that mean just the emails, or the emails and the foundation, and how you came to that decision.

TRUMP: Well, there was a report that somebody said that I’m not enthused about it. Look, I want to move forward, I don’t want to move back. And I don’t want to hurt the Clintons. I really don’t.

She went through a lot. And suffered greatly in many different ways. And I am not looking to hurt them at all. The campaign was vicious. They say it was the most vicious primary and the most vicious campaign…. I would imagine. I would imagine. I’m just telling you, Maggie, I’m not looking to hurt them. I think they’ve been through a lot. They’ve gone through a lot.

I’m really looking … I think we have to get the focus of the country into looking forward….

MATTHEW PURDY, deputy managing editor: So you’re definitively taking that off the table? The investigation?

TRUMP: No, but the question was asked.

PURDY: About the emails and the foundation?

TRUMP: No, no, but it’s just not something that I feel very strongly about. I feel very strongly about health care. I feel very strongly about an immigration bill that I think even the people in this room can be happy. You know, you’ve been talking about immigration bills for 50 years and nothing’s ever happened.

I feel very strongly about an immigration bill that’s fair and just and a lot of other things. There are a lot of things I feel strongly about. I’m not looking to look back and go through this. This was a very painful period. This was a very painful election with all of the email things and all of the foundation things and all of the everything that they went through and the whole country went through. This was a very painful period of time….

CAROLYN RYAN, senior editor for politics: Do you think it would disappoint your supporters who seemed very animated by the idea of accountability in the Clintons? What would you say to them?

TRUMP: I don’t think they will be disappointed. I think I will explain it, that we have to, in many ways save our country.

Because our country’s really in bad, big trouble. We have a lot of trouble. A lot of problems. And one of the big problems, I talk about, divisiveness. I think that a lot of people will appreciate … I’m not doing it for that reason. I’m doing it because it’s time to go in a different direction….

ELISABETH BUMILLER, Washington bureau chief: I just wanted to follow up on the question you were asked about not pursuing any investigations into Hillary Clinton. Did you mean both the email investigation and the foundation investigation — you will not pursue either one of those?

TRUMP: Yeah, look, you know we’ll have people that do things but my inclination would be, for whatever power I have on the matter, is to say let’s go forward. This has been looked at for so long. Ad nauseam. Let’s go forward. And you know, you could also make the case that some good work was done in the foundation and they could have made mistakes, etc. etc. I think it’s time, I think it’s time for people to say let’s go and solve some of the problems that we have, which are massive problems and, you know, I do think that they’ve gone through a lot. I think losing is going through a lot. It was a tough, it was a very tough evening for her. I think losing is going through a lot. So, for whatever it’s worth, my, my attitude is strongly we have to go forward, we have so many different problems to solve, I don’t think we have to delve back in the past. I also think that would be a very divisive, well I think it would be very divisive, you know I’m talking about bringing together, and then they go into all sorts of stuff, I think it would be very, very divisive for the country.

Note that while Trump said he doesn’t want to “hurt” Hillary and prefers to “go forward” to tackle the many serious problems of this very divided country, he also said that he, as President, will have very little control over what happens. By that, Trump meant that it’s the Department of Justice that prosecutes, not POTUS.

But when pointedly asked whether he’s taking the criminal investigation of Hillary and the Clinton Foundation off the table, Trump said no:

MATTHEW PURDY, deputy managing editor: So you’re definitively taking that off the table? The investigation?

TRUMP: No, but the question was asked.

That point is reinforced by NYT in a tweet at 10:15AM yesterday, referring to its political reporter Maggie Haberman who was at the meeting with Trump:

nyt-tweet-on-trump-prosecuting-hillary

Some other things Trump said in his NYT interview:

  • On the brutal campaign: “It’s been 18 months of brutality in a true sense, but we won it. We won it pretty big. The final numbers are coming out . . . far beyond what anybody’s wildest expectation was . . . . I would do, during the last month, two or three [rallies] a day. That’s a lot. Because that’s not easy when you have big crowds. Those speeches, that’s not an easy way of life, doing three a day. Then I said the last two days, I want to do six and seven. And I’m not sure anybody has ever done that. But we did six and we did seven and the last one ended at 1 o’clock in the morning in Michigan.”
  • Electoral College: “the popular vote would have been a lot easier, but it’s a whole different campaign. I would have been in California, I would have been in Texas, Florida and New York, and we wouldn’t have gone anywhere else . . . . I think that’s the genius of the Electoral College. I was never a fan of the Electoral College until now . . . now I like it for two reasons. What it does do is it gets you out to see states that you’ll never see otherwise. It’s very interesting. Like Maine . . . . “
  • Military votes: Votes from members of the Armed Services are still coming in and 85% of them are for Trump.
  • On the Alt-right, whom NYT executive editor Dean Baquet characterized as white racists: “First of all, I don’t want to energize the group. I’m not looking to energize them. I don’t want to energize the group, and I disavow the group . . . . What we do want to do is we want to bring the country together, because the country is very, very divided, and . . . I’m going to work very hard to bring the country together.”
  • Climate change: “But a lot of smart people disagree with you. I have a very open mind. And I’m going to study a lot of the things that happened on it and we’re going to look at it very carefully. But I have an open mind . . . . You know the hottest day ever was in 1890-something, 98. You know, you can make lots of cases for different views. I have a totally open mind . . . . It’s a very complex subject. I’m not sure anybody is ever going to really know. I know we have, they say they have science on one side but then they also have those horrible emails that were sent between the scientists. Where was that, in Geneva or wherever five years ago? Terrible. Where they got caught, you know, so you see that and you say, what’s this all about.”
  • Steve Bannon: Trump was questioned whether he should have appointed Bannon to be chief White House strategist because Bannon “is a hero of the alt-right” and “described by some as racist and anti-Semitic”. Trump answered: “I’ve known Steve Bannon a long time. If I thought he was a racist, or alt-right, or any of the things that we can, you know, the terms we can use, I wouldn’t even think about hiring him. First of all, I’m the one that makes the decision, not Steve Bannon or anybody else. And Kellyanne will tell you that . . . . Steve went to Harvard . . . he was a Naval officer . . . . I’ve known him for a long time. He’s a very, very smart guy. I think he was with Goldman Sachs on top of everything else . . . . In many respects I think his views are actually on the other side of what a lot of people might think . . . . Breitbart, first of all, is just a publication. And, you know, they cover stories like you cover stories. Now, they are certainly a much more conservative paper, to put it mildly, than The New York Times. But Breitbart really is a news organization that’s become quite successful, and it’s got readers and it does cover subjects that are on the right, but it covers subjects on the left also.”
  • Republican Party: “Paul Ryan right now loves me, Mitch McConnell loves me, it’s amazing how winning can change things . . . . Right now they’re in love with me. O.K.? Four weeks ago they weren’t in love with me.”
  • About Rust Belt jobs: In response to NYT columnist Thomas Friedman’s question if Trump is worried that manufacturing companies will keep their factories here, but the jobs will be replaced by robots, Trump answered, “They will, and we’ll make the robots too . . . . Right now we don’t make the robots. We don’t make anything. But we’re going to, I mean, look, robotics is becoming very big and we’re going to do that. We’re going to have more factories. We can’t lose 70,000 factories [since George W. Bush]. Just can’t do it. We’re going to start making things . . . we have companies leaving our country because the taxes are too high. But they’re leaving also because of the regulations. And I would say, of the two, and I would not have thought this, regulation cuts, substantial regulation cuts, are more important than, and more enthusiastically supported, than even the big tax cuts.”

~Eowyn

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