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German police say devout Muslim accused of jihad bomb plot was once a neo-Nazi

Saturday, March 4, 2017 8:39
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(Before It's News)

This report treats Islam and Nazism as if they were opposites, as if this man moved from one extreme to the other. In reality, there is a close kinship between the two.

Nazis and Islamists The Washington Times

“Had Charles Martel not been victorious,” Hitler told his inner crowd in August 1942, “then we should in all probability have been converted to Mohammedanism, that cult which glorifies the heroism and which opens up the seventh Heaven to the bold warrior alone. Then the Germanic races would have conquered the world.” Hitler told Mr. Speer that Islam is “perfectly suited to the Germanic temperament.”

During the Second World War, the Nazis worked on plans to build the “Amerikabomber,” an airplane specially devised to fly suicide missions into Manhattan’s skyscrapers.

Albert Speer, the Nazi minister for armaments, recalled in his diary: “It was almost as if [Hitler] was in a delirium when he described to us how New York would go up in flames. He imagined how the skyscrapers would turn into huge blazing torches. How they would crumble while the reflection of the flames would light the skyline against the dark sky.” Hitler hated Manhattan. It was, he said, “the center of world Jewry.” Less than 60 years later, Hitler’s plans were executed by Muslim immigrants living in Germany. At the 2003 trial of the
network around Mohamed Atta (the pilot who flew into the World Trade Center), Shahid Nickels, a German convert to Islam and a friend of Atta’s, said that the Islamists had targeted Manhattan because it is “the center of world Jewry, and the world of finance and commerce controlled by it.”

The parallels between Nazism and Islamism are overwhelming.

“German police say suspected Islamist extremist accused of plot was once a neo-Nazi,” by Adam Taylor, Washington Post, February 28, 2017:

Last week, German police arrested a 26-year-old man on suspicion of plotting an Islamist-inspired attack. The man, identified only as “Sascha L.,” is accused of plotting to lure police officers and soldiers into a trap. When authorities searched his apartment in Northeim, Lower Saxony, they found chemicals and electronics that could be used to make explosives.

Such plots have not been infrequent in Germany over the past few years. However, when looking through Sascha’s history, authorities found another detail that made his case more unusual: Until 2013, the suspected Islamist extremist may have been a neo-Nazi.

According to reports in Der Spiegel, authorities have found a YouTube channel on which a man thought to be Sascha warns of the threat posed by Muslims, whom he accused of trying to impose Islamic law on the country, as well as left-wing activists and anti-fascists.

In the videos, according to Der Spiegel, Sascha sometimes wears a white mask, signifying a possible link to the Immortals, a prominent neo-Nazi organization in Germany. One video, titled “Tips for the fight against cockroaches,” is said to have shown Sascha calling for attacks against immigrants in Germany.

That video was uploaded to YouTube in May 2013, Der Spiegel reports. A year later, Sascha is thought to have converted to Islam. According to Die Tageszeitung, Sascha’s Facebook page reflected this shift — he liked a regional Islamist extremist group’s page and changed his profile to include the slogan “Don’t push! I have a bomb in my backpack.” Sascha also faced a court case over spreading the prohibited symbols of the Islamic State militant group on the Internet.

As unusual as the Sascha case may sound, it isn’t without precedent. Extremists going from one extreme to the other is “not that uncommon,” says Seamus Hughes, deputy director of the Program on Extremism at George Washington University. “There are some overlaps in terms of groups both sides hate so [there is] an easier transition from one extreme to the other,” Hughes added.

There are at least two examples of U.S. citizens who’ve made similar transitions, Hughes said. Emerson Begolly, who posted photographs of himself online that show him wearing a Nazi uniform and uploaded jihadist-inspired songs, was arrested in 2011. More recently, a Virginia man named Nicholas Young who was charged last year with attempting to support the Islamic State also admitted to dressing up as a Nazi and collecting Nazi memorabilia….



Source: http://pamelageller.com/2017/03/german-jihadi-nazi.html/

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