Profile image
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

Another opinion survey

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 14:34
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.
Civis Analytics (CA), a firm started by 2012 Obama campaign veterans, conducted a telephone opinion survey February 28 about American policy priorities.  Powerline reported their results hereand Vox, here.
Powerline excerpts two charts from the CA survey.
The first chart shows responses of likely Democratic voters – whose top priority if  Democrats take control of the White House and Congress in 2020, is “health care”!  Really? Because Obamacare didn’t work?  Because this time, they’ll fix it fer shur?  
Reminds me of an old Flip Wilson punch line:  “Hell no, you broke yours off already!” 
The second chart shows responses to the same questions, only this time the sample group is all likely voters – in other words, not just Democrats.  Notice how the percentages change from the first chart to the second.  The second chart reveals far less less support to “health care”.
Yet Civis Analytics has this to say: Democratic voters, and voters in general, seem very clear in their preference that health care come first.”  Vox opines that “the numbers are strikingly similar, with answers more concentrated around health care and guns”.   Really? Voters in general?  Strikingly similar??
I don’t think so.  I say CA and Vox have it wrong.  I say Powerline has it right: “the results skew when all likely voters—not just Democrats—are reported”.  How much does it skew?  Assuming CA surveyed roughly equal numbers of likely Democratic and non-Democratic voters, the results in the two charts imply about 17% support for “health care” among likely non-Democratic voters. Do 45% and 17% seem strikingly similar to you?   Do 45% and 17% tell you that these numbers measure underlying agreement?   
Of course not.  CA and Vox both err in looking at the average of the combined surveys as though that average reflects unified public opinion. It’s an error because the responses of the two survey populations show a clear and sharp difference of opinion about “health care”.  Therefore it’s false to claim the overall average represents any general preference.   CA’s conclusion is like claiming that, on average, Americans have one testicle and one ovary.  It’s only “true” when you ignore the reality underneath the average. 

Yet despite Civis Analytics’ (and Vox’s) equivocations, I think the CA survey does reveal two important truths – (1) “health care” remains a divisive issue among Americans and (2) the division still appears to have more to do with politics than with the actual substance of “health care”.  
Original content copyright © InsureBlog


Source: http://insureblog.blogspot.com/2018/03/another-opinion-survey.html

We encourage you to Share our Reports, Analyses, Breaking News and Videos. Simply Click your Favorite Social Media Button and Share.

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories
 

Featured

 

Top Global

 

Top Alternative

 

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.