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Aww shucks, y’all …. thanks!

Tuesday, January 10, 2017 14:06
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(Before It's News)

bro_appvoices_winners4cropped

We’re speechless. We’re honored. We’re deeply grateful.

The readers of Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine have voted Appalachian Voices as the “Best Environmental Organization” of 2016.

We had stiff competition, to be sure — MountainTrue, champions of resilient forests, clean waters and healthy communities in Western North Carolina, and Carolina Climbers Coalition, which promotes safe climbing practices and preserves access to climbing areas in North Carolina and South Carolina.

We wish to thank everyone who voted for Appalachian Voices. It’s a tremendous honor, made even more special as we enter our 20th anniversary year. We are committed to doing our best, doing all we can to continue protecting our beloved Appalachian region in the years ahead.

From BRO:

Environmental Organization

Appalachian Voices, Boone, N.C.

Favorites:
Mountain True, N.C.
Carolina Climbers Coalition, N.C.

For 20 years, Appalachian Voices has given voice to those without—to rivers and mountains, to the air we breathe and the Appalachian natives who have been ignored for generations.

“We are in tumultuous times as America’s massive energy sector shifts from fossil fuels to solar, wind and other clean sources,” says Appalachian Voices Communications Director Cat McCue. “Appalachian Voices works at the very nexus of that transition, defending our region from mountaintop removal coal mining and massive fracked-gas pipelines, while promoting clean energy sources that create jobs, community wealth, and a healthy and just future for Appalachia.”

In 2016, the organization worked hard to shed light on the threats our beloved Russell Fork River faces from coal mining, held Duke Energy accountable for the coal ash spills of 2014, and assessed hundreds of abandoned mine lands for potential use as solar facilities or recreational areas.

Protecting the Central and Southern Appalachian Mountain Region

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