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More evidence that Meiolania is a basal turtle

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 12:51
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(Before It's News)

Figure 5. Meiolania, the most primitive of known turtles, has lateral forelimbs, like non turtles.

Figure 1. Meiolania, the most primitive of known turtles, has lateral forelimbs, like non turtles. Extant turtle elbows point anteriorly. 

Earlier we looked at the bizarre and seeming highly derived skulls of Meiolania (Fig. 1) and Niolamia, (Fig. 2) two large late-surviving meiolanid turtles that are only known from rather recent fossil material following an undocumented origin in the Late Permian or Early Triassic.  They both nested as sisters to Elginia (Fig. 2; Late Permian), a toothed turtle sister with horns. So the horns and frills are primitive, not derived.

Figure 2. Comparing the skulls of Elginia, with teeth, and the turtle, Niolamia, toothless.

Figure 2. Comparing the skulls of Elginia, with teeth, and the turtle, Niolamia, toothless.

Here’s a review
of various turtle ancestor candidates in graphic format (Fig. 3). A candidate touted by several recent authors, Eunotosaurus, is among those shown.

Figure 1. In traditional studies Eunotosaurus nests at the base of turtles, but that is only in the absence of the taxa shown here and correctly scored. Here Eunotosaurus is convergent with turtles, but not related. Turtles arise from small pareiasaurs.

Figure 3. In traditional studies Eunotosaurus nests at the base of turtles, but that is only in the absence of the taxa shown here and correctly scored. Here Eunotosaurus is convergent with turtles, but not related. Turtles arise from small pareiasaurs.

Cervical count
Pareiasaurs have 6 cervicals. Turtles have 8, several of which are tucked inside the shell. Proganochelys, often touted as the most basal turtle, has 8 cervicals. Horned Meiolania, at the base of the hard-shell turtles has 6 cervicals with ribs and 2 without ribs according to Gaffney (1985; Fig. 4). Most living turtles do not have cervical ribs. In Proganochelys cervical ribs are much reduced.

Note that in Odontochelys (Fig. 3 a similar situation arises where the all the vertebrae anterior to the expanded ribs are considered cervicals, even though two are posterior to the scapula. Similarly, in Proganchelys (Fig. 3) the last cervical is posterior to the scapula. In other tetrapods (let me know if I am forgetting any), all the cervicals are anterior to the scapula and a few dorsal vertebrae typically appear anterior to the scapulae. The tucking of the scapula beneath the ribs of turtles is a recurring problem with many offering insight.

Figure 1. Meiolania cervicals. Did Gaffney follow tradition when he identified 8 cervicals here? Only 6 have ribs and the shape changes between 6 and 7.

Figure 4. Meiolania cervicals. Did Gaffney follow tradition when he identified 8 cervicals here? Only 6 have ribs (yellow) and the shape changes between 6 and 7.

There are several different possible nesting sites
for turtles with regard to living reptiles (including mammals and birds, Fig. 5). Only the LRT (in yellow) has not made it to the academic literature (after several tries) because it is the only tree topology that splits Archosauromorpha from Lepidosauromorpha in the Viséan, further in the past than other workers venture to place reptiles that still look like amphibians. Until we get the basic topology down and agreed upon, it is going to be difficult to nest turtles properly.

Figure 2. Various hypotheses regarding turtle origins. The LRT is added in yellow.

Figure 5. Various hypotheses regarding turtle origins. The LRT is added in yellow. Most studies show Synapsida as the basal dichotomy, whereas the LRT divides Lepidosauromorpha from Archosauromorpha together with two separate origins for diapsid reptiles.

References
Gaffney ES 1985. The cervical and caudal vertebrae of the cryptodiran turtle, Meiolania platyceps, form the Pleistocene of Lord Howe Island, Australia. American Museum Novitates 2805:1-29.

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