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Dingavis: fangs on a basal bird

Friday, February 9, 2018 11:42
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Here’s an Early Cretaceous bird
at the base of the Odontornithes (toothed neognaths) with premaxillary and anterior dentary teeth developed into fangs, apparently overlooked by the original authors of Dingavis longimaxilla  (IVPP V20284, O’Connor, Wang and Hu 2016). They were more intrigued by the length of the rostrum and did not appear to delve into the details (Figs. 1,2).

Figure 1. Dingavis longimaxilla in situ nests with Hongshanornis at the base of neognath birds. ” data-medium-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-instu588.gif?w=584&h=702?w=250″ data-large-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-instu588.gif?w=584&h=702?w=584″ class=”size-full wp-image-29536″ src=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-instu588.gif?w=584&h=702″ alt=”Figure 1. Dingavis longimaxilla in situ nests with Hongshanornis at the base of neognath birds. ” width=”584″ height=”702″ />

Figure 1. Dingavis longimaxilla in situ nests with Hongshanornis at the base of neognath birds. This image is about 3/4 full size, so this is a robin-sized bird.

Maybe they rushed through
Attempting a reconstruction helps the mind sort out some of the problems in crushed fossils such as this one. You can try on one idea after another until one seems to fit. 

Figure 2. Dingavis skull. The large anterior teeth were overlooked in the original description. The naris appears to be quite elongate here. ” data-medium-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=584&h=712?w=246″ data-large-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=584&h=712?w=584″ class=”size-full wp-image-29537″ src=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=584&h=712″ alt=”Figure 2. Dingavis skull. The large anterior teeth were overlooked in the original description. The naris appears to be quite elongate here. ” width=”584″ height=”712″ srcset=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=584&h=712 584w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=123&h=150 123w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg?w=246&h=300 246w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/dingavis-skull588.jpg 588w” sizes=”(max-width: 584px) 100vw, 584px” />

Figure 2. Dingavis skull. The large anterior teeth were overlooked in the original description. The naris appears to be quite elongate here.

It’s worthwhile to compare Dingavis
to its more plesiomorphic sister, Hongshanornis (Fig. 3). Note the four tiny premaxillary teeth and the others lining the jaws.

That beak tip of Dingavis
is similar by analogy to that of the giant petrel, Macronectes. However, the size differences are too great to draw too much of an analogy.

Figure 3. Hongshanornis skull in situ. Note the four tiny premaxillary teeth, two of which enlarge in Dingavis. ” data-medium-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornisdnhm_d2945_6_skull5881.gif?w=584&h=308?w=300″ data-large-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornisdnhm_d2945_6_skull5881.gif?w=584&h=308?w=584″ class=”size-full wp-image-29545″ src=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornisdnhm_d2945_6_skull5881.gif?w=584&h=308″ alt=”Figure 3. Hongshanornis skull in situ. Note the four tiny premaxillary teeth, two of which enlarge in Dingavis.” width=”584″ height=”308″ />

Figure 3. Hongshanornis skull in situ. Note the four tiny premaxillary teeth, two of which enlarge in Dingavis.

Wikipedia reports
“Hongshanornis is a member of the group Hongshanornithidae, to which it lent its name. It is closely related to Longicrusavis, which existed alongside Hongshanornis in the Dawangzhangzi ecosystem” In the LRT these taxa are basal to the Late Cretaceous toothed birds, Hesperornis and Ichthyornis. and so appear to be part of the Odontornithes extending to the Early Cretaceous, shortly after the appearance of Archaeopteryx and other Solnhofen birds.

Figure 4. Hongshanornis in situ with drawing from original paper. ” data-medium-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornis_insitu_overall588.gif?w=584&h=361?w=300″ data-large-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornis_insitu_overall588.gif?w=584&h=361?w=584″ class=”size-full wp-image-29541″ src=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/hongshanornis_insitu_overall588.gif?w=584&h=361″ alt=”Figure 4. Hongshanornis in situ with drawing from original paper. ” width=”584″ height=”361″ />

Figure 4. Hongshanornis DNHM D2945, in situ with drawing from original paper. Colors added here.

Wikipedia reports
“In 2016, it was suggested that Dingavis might be cogeneric to the closely related genera Changzuiornis and Juehuaornis [Fig. 5] that might have been found in the same formation, in which case Juehuaornis would have priority.”

Figure 5. Juehuaornis does not have premaxillary teeth, so it is not congeneric with Juehuaornis. ” data-medium-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=584&h=551?w=300″ data-large-file=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=584&h=551?w=584″ class=”size-full wp-image-29542″ src=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=584&h=551″ alt=”Figure 5. Juehuaornis does not have premaxillary teeth, so it is not congeneric with Juehuaornis. ” width=”584″ height=”551″ srcset=”https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=584&h=551 584w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=150&h=142 150w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg?w=300&h=283 300w, https://pterosaurheresies.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/juehuaornis_zhangi588.jpg 588w” sizes=”(max-width: 584px) 100vw, 584px” />

Figure 5. Juehuaornis does not have premaxillary teeth, so it is not congeneric with Juehuaornis.

Lacking large anterior fangs,
Juehuanornis (Fig. 5) is not congeneric with Dingavis. 

References
O’Connor JK, Wang M and Hu H 2016.
A new ornithuromorph (Aves) with an elongate rostrum from the Jehol Biota, and the early evolution of rostralization in birds, Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2015.1129518
Zhou Z and Zhang F 2005. Discovery of an ornithurine bird and its implication for Early Cretaceous avian radiation. PNAS 102(52): 18998-19002. doi:10.1073/pnas.0507106102

wiki/Hongshanornis
wiki/Dingavis



Source: https://pterosaurheresies.wordpress.com/2018/02/10/dingavis-fangs-on-a-basal-bird/

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