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Growing Roses from Cuttings in the Fall.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 1:49
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Growing Roses from Cuttings in the Fall.

Growing Roses from Cuttings in the Fall.

Basically there are two ways, two different times of the year to grow roses from cuttings.  Softwood Cutting Season begins in June and continues through the summer.  By fall the wood hardens off and you have to do things a bit differently, You have to Apply Hardwood Cutting Strategies.

Let’s keep things simple and put rose propagation into two different categories.

  1.  The Mason Jar Method.
  2. The Burrito Method.

The Mason Jar Method is described in this Post in Detail, but essentially, in the fall, it’s as simple as sticking a few rose cuttings in the soil and covering them with a Mason jar.  You can use that method in the fall with good success, but keep in mind, no mater what you do in the fall it is going to take longer because the wood is hard and the cuttings are dormant.

The Burrito Method goes like this;

Remove the leaves and side branches from rose cuttings.

Remove the leaves and side branches from rose cuttings.

Gather some canes from the roses that you’d like to propagate.  Do Not Propagate Patented Plants.  No matter who or why you are doing them, it’s against the law to propagate patented plants.  Check the tag for patent info.

Remove the leaves and side branches.  All you really want is the stem.  You can leave the thorns.

Rose cutting, make your bottom cut right below a leaf node.

Rose cutting, make your bottom cut right below a leaf node.

If you look closely the little green bump to the right of my pruning shears is a leaf node, or a bud union.  That’s where new leaves and eventually new branches emerge from.  When making a hardwood cutting you want to cut right below, but not into, that bud union.

The piece of stem below the bud union will die and rot if you leave it and you really don’t want that going on underground when your cuttings are trying to root.  The new roots will emerge from and around that bud union.

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Wound the cutting on both sides.

Wound the cutting on both sides.

I rarely wound any of the cuttings that I make, even hardwood cuttings, but since roses are a little finicky when it comes to getting them to root I’d recommend wounding the cuttings on two sides.  Just scrape with a knife and remove the bark, exposing the cambium layer.

Dip the rose cuttings in a rooting compound.

Dip the butt ends of the rose cuttings in a rooting compound.

Any rooting compound will do, powder, liquid or gel, it makes no difference.  I like liquid rooting compounds because you have to mix them with water and you simple adjust the strength for hardwood or softwood cuttings when you mix it.  The directions are on the bottle.  With powders you have to buy different strengths for different times of year.  Softwood cuttings in summer, hardwood cuttings in fall and winter.

Dip several sections of newspaper in a bucket of water.

Dip several sections of newspaper in a bucket of water.

Thorughly soak the newspaper getting it wet through and through.

Thoroughly soak the newspaper getting it wet through and through.

Wring the newspaper to squeeze excess water.

Wring the newspaper to squeeze excess water.

With the butt ends even, wrap the rose cuttings in the wet newspaper.

With the butt ends even, wrap the rose cuttings in the wet newspaper.

Tuck the ends of the bundle and wrap again in more wet newspaper.

Tuck the ends of the bundle and wrap again in more wet newspaper.

Wrap the rose cuttings in several layers of wet newspaper until you have a

Wrap the rose cuttings in several layers of wet newspaper until you have a “Rose Cutting Burrito”.

Slip the rose cutting Burrito into a plastic bag.

Slip the rose cutting Burrito into a plastic bag.

The Rose Cutting Burrito!

The Rose Cutting Burrito!

That’s it!  Fold the bag over, secure it with a string, rubber band or twist tie and place in a cool place and wait.  Typically you should see roots in about 6 weeks.  Once the cuttings show some roots or even just the building up of callous they can be potted or planted in a garden.  But don’t be in a hurry, the cuttings in the Burrito should be fine for a number of weeks.

Be sure to visit this page for More About Growing Roses from Cuttings.

Questions or comments, post them below.

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