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Washington State Suspends Lethal Action Against Profanity Peak Wolf Pack

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 16:33
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Wild Wolf Pack
Washington State Suspends Lethal Action Against Profanity Peak Wolf Pack
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

OLYMPIA – -( The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has suspended its pursuit of the remaining members of a wolf pack that preyed on cattle throughout the summer in northeast Washington.

WDFW Director Jim Unsworth today lifted his previous order authorizing staff to take lethal action to stop predation by the Profanity Peak wolf pack now that most livestock are being moved off federal grazing allotments in the Colville National Forest.

He noted, however, that the department will continue to monitor the four remaining wolves – an adult female and three juveniles – and will renew efforts to remove wolves if they resume preying on livestock this year.

“The goal of our action was to stop predations on livestock in the near future,” Unsworth said. “With the pack reduced in size from 12 members to four and most livestock off the grazing allotments, the likelihood of depredations in the near future is low.”

Since Aug. 5 2106, state wildlife managers have shot and killed seven members of the pack after non-lethal deterrence measures failed to stop the pack from preying on cattle in the grazing area in Ferry County. Another wolf, a pup, is presumed to have died of natural causes.

As of Oct. 3 2016, WDFW had documented 15 dead or injured cattle, including 10 confirmed and five probable wolf depredations.

The Profanity Peak pack is one of 19 wolf packs documented in Washington earlier this year. Sixteen of those packs – including four identified since the previous year – are located in the eastern third of the state, where wolves were delisted from the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2009.

Unsworth said the department’s action against the Profanity Peak pack was consistent with both the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and a new protocol for the lethal removal of wolves developed this year by WDFW in conjunction with an 18-member advisory group composed of environmentalists, livestock producers and hunters.

Under that protocol, WDFW can take lethal action against wolves only if field staff confirms four or more attacks on livestock within a calendar year, or six or more attacks within two consecutive calendar years. The protocol also requires ranchers to employ specified non-lethal measures designed to deter wolves from preying on their livestock before WDFW will take lethal action against wolves.

Donny Martorello, WDFW wolf policy lead, said both of the ranchers who lost livestock to the Profanity Peak pack met that requirement by using range riders to help keep watch over their herds, and by removing or securing cattle carcasses to avoid attracting wolves. One rancher, he said, also turned his calves out to pasture at a higher weight to improve their chance of surviving an attack by predators.

Once the number of dead and injured cattle reached the threshold for lethal action, WDFW took incremental steps to remove wolves from the pack, as specified in the protocol.

Key events in the department’s involvement with the Profanity Peak pack include:

Early June: Ranchers arrived with their livestock on federal grazing allotments. WDFW field staff captured two adult members of the Profanity Peak pack and fitted them with GPS radio-collars, allowing the department to monitor the pack’s movements.

  • July 8: WDFW confirmed the first calf killed by wolves.
  • July 12: WDFW documented two probable wolf attacks, one of which was on a second rancher’s allotment.
  • Aug. 3: WDFW confirmed the fourth and fifth wolf attack on cattle and documented three probable wolf attacks. Per the protocol, the WDFW director authorized staff to remove some members of the pack to deter further depredation.
  • Aug. 5: WDFW removed two female wolves from the Profanity Peak pack.
  • Aug.18-19: The director ended his authorization for lethal removal after 14 days without a depredation. The next day, he authorized the removal of up to the full pack after field staff documented four more wolf attacks, two confirmed and two probable.
  • Aug. 21-Sept. 29: WDFW removed five more wolves from the Profanity Peak pack.
  • Oct 3: WDFW documented the last depredation on cattle by the Profanity Peak pack.
  • Oct 18: WDFW suspended lethal removal of wolves in the Profanity Peak pack.

Martorello said WDFW will continue to closely monitor the pack and will renew efforts to remove wolves if they return to preying on livestock this year.

Ferry County Sheriff Ray Maycumber said his staff will take a defensive position and monitor the movements of the adult female wolf for signs of conflict with people, pets, or livestock in lowland areas.

WDFW will issue a complete report of its management actions regarding the Profanity Peak pack next month.

  • The state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan is available on WDFW’s website at
  • WDFW’s protocol for removing wolves that prey on livestock is available at

This post Washington State Suspends Lethal Action Against Profanity Peak Wolf Pack appeared first on Shooting Sports News .

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