Online:
Visits:
Stories:
Profile image
By Ready Nutrition
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home

Friday, July 14, 2017 2:26
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)


ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination to see that we’re living in perilous times and on the brink of a slew of problems.  There are several flashpoints occurring domestically and throughout the world that can translate into destabilization at any time.  Knowing these things, your preparations and training need to continue.  You can continue this preparation by conducting a home assessment regarding medicines and supplies you will need.

It’s time to prepare for the worst-case scenario with this best-selling preparedness manual

What do I mean by this?  I mean for you to specifically identify all the needs of each of your family members and begin acquiring them.  Family members have varying needs depending on age and physical condition.  Now is the time to ensure you have all the meds you need and the vitamins you will need when the SHTF.  Allow me to sound the personal “trumpet” that I have been sounding throughout the years and in many articles:

You guys and gals need to get into good physical shape: it cannot be overemphasized.

7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home

That being said, how do you start?  It is simple enough if you just insert a measure of organization into it.  Let’s do it, shall we?

  1. Start by identifying family members who have special needs and/or ongoing, long-term treatment in terms of medication.  Examples of conditions can be Type I Diabetics, Blood Pressure/Circulatory patients (meds such as Calcium Channel blockers, etc.), and family members with respiratory compromise (such as COPD, or severe, chronic asthma).
  2. Make a chart/sheet for each family member and identify what they need: The correct medicine, the amount needed/dosage, the quantity that is on hand, and a plan to attain more of it.  BE SPECIFIC!  Accuracy is critical: you cannot afford a “transposition error” either in dosage or in the name of the med.  “Flexiril” and “Flagyl” should never be confused, for example.  One extra “zero” at the end of a dosage could mean death; one zero “short” could mean substandard, inadequate dosage.
  3. Shop the sources: Price is almost as important as quality…because you will need quantities. Many items can be purchased at discount stores. Make sure you have these 50 items as the basis for your medical supplies. Once you have these, then you can begin to combine your medical supplies to make first response packs for faster medical attention when emergencies occur. Check out all the discount pharmacies that you can and do your research.  Also, convince your happy, Hallmark-Card family physician to write these extra prescriptions for you.  If he or she won’t do it?  DX’em.  That’s an Army term: meaning dump/discard them.  If you don’t use the stones now, you won’t use them when the SHTF.
  4. Pet antibiotics: Yes, “protect the pets,” as I’ve explained in other articles. Pet amoxicillin, pet erythromycin, pet Praziquantel (Biltricide).  All of these “goodies” and more are available…to keep those “pets” readily supplied with medicine.  ‘Nuff said there.
  5. Vitamins/supplements: Concentrate on the multi-vitamins, and others that are crucial, such as Vitamin C. Again, you need to be sharp when it comes to quality and quantity.  Here are five supplements you should seriously consider. Never sacrifice quality for quantity, except if the comparable product is so close to the “top dog” that the difference is negligible.
  6. Herbal/Naturopathic supplies: Here is where your research is going to be critical. DO NOT EXPECT TO BE “SPOON-FED” INFORMATION, especially by your photo-frame-phony-photo family physician.  You have to assess on your own what herbs will do the backup for your family member’s (or your) needs if the med supply dries up or is unavailable.  There’s a secondary reason: you need to learn and memorize these herbs “cold,” because you may have to scrounge for them as well…in a ruined, burned-out health food concern, or out in the wild with wild-crafting.
  7. OPSEC: Don’t allow anyone outside of the immediate family (and even with them…screen ‘em!) to know about your medicines.  You need to safeguard them in protective containers that will safeguard them from elements and secret them from the eyes of marauders or other jerks that will pillage them.

Now is the time to get all of this stuff done.  You are responsible in the end for taking care of yourself and your family.  Do not procrastinate.  You may not have a perfect example to follow, but you can allow common sense, savvy, and street smarts to guide you in the path you need to pursue.  Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.  The “bad days” will come upon us in an instant.  Less than an instant.  Fight that good fight, and stock up on those supplies you’ll need to take care of your family now…because you won’t be able to on the day after it hits!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published July 14th, 2017


Source: http://readynutrition.com/resources/7-critical-components-of-a-prepared-home_14072017/

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories
 

Featured

 

Top Global

 

Top Alternative

 

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.