Visitors Now:
Total Visits:
Total Stories:
Profile image
By Freedom Bunker
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:

A Truly Free Press Will Always Be an Inconvenience To The Government (New at Reason)

Thursday, October 13, 2016 6:04
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)

We're not in the public interestIs it legally or ethically wrong for the media to publish materials that make government figures (or those who aspire to such roles) look bad, if those materials are stolen? According to Andrew Napolitano, “In a word: No.”

In a new column for Reason, Napolitano explains how the actions of one Pentagon contractor—Daniel Ellsburg, who leaked the so-called “Pentagon Papers”—led to the Supreme Court ruling “that when the media obtains truthful documents that are of material interest to the public, the media is free to publish those documents, as well as commentary about them, without fear of criminal or civil liability.”

Napolitano writes that this ruling is especially relevant given the recent revelations about the two major party presidential candidates:

It seems that at every turn during this crazy presidential election campaign — with its deeply flawed principal candidates (whom do you hate less?) — someone’s personal or professional computer records are being hacked. First it was Hillary Clinton’s emails that she had failed to surrender to the State Department. Then it was a portion of Donald Trump’s 1995 tax returns, showing a $916 million loss he claimed during boom times. Then it was those Clinton emails again, this time showing her unacted-upon doubts about two of our Middle Eastern allies’ involvement in 9/11 and her revelation of some secrets about the killing of Osama bin Laden.

The reason we know about these leaks is the common thread among them — the willingness of the media to publish what was apparently stolen. Hence the question: Can the government hold the press liable — criminally or civilly — for the publication of known stolen materials that the public wants to know about? In a word: No.

View this article.

Report abuse


Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories



Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.