Profile image
Story Views
Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

Why Don’t The Amish Get Cancer?

% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

A recent study published in the journal Cancer Causes and Control has revealed that Amish people have virtually no cancer within their population, and are considered the most healthy people in America. 

 

Researchers from Ohio State University originally launched a study on the Amish population to see whether rates of cancer would be higher due to their lack of conventional medical care. What they found, however, shocked them.

The Amish were found to have much lower rates of cancer than the rest of the population, so researchers decided to look more closely at their lifestyle choices and diets to find out why.

Naturalnews.com reports:

Most Amish people do not smoke or drink and they are typically not sexually promiscuous, leading researchers to believe that these lifestyle factors play an important role in the limited number of cancer cases.

 

 

Other factors examined include the high amount of physical labor undertaken by the Amish. Most Amish people work in farming, construction, and other production jobs that require intense physical activity that keeps them healthy and in shape. While the rest of America sits in fluorescent-lit cubicles all day, the Amish work hard to produce crops, build furniture and structures, and produce useful goods, which researchers recognize contributes to their excellent health.

Another important factor not specifically examined in the study is the fact that the Amish grow and raise all their own food. They employ time-tested, organic methods that provide them with healthy fruits, vegetables, milk, meat, and other untainted foods that most Americans never get. Rich in living enzymes, vitamins, and nutrients Amish food is grown and raised the way it should be, resulting in improved health.

 

While some may ridicule their secluded lifestyle, the Amish commitment to simple, productive lives and clean, local food is benefiting their health in ways that the rest of America can only dream about. When compared to a life of sitting in office buildings all day, eating processed and genetically-modified junk food, and popping prescription medications, it becomes clear which lifestyle is truly deserving of contempt.

 

http://yournewswire.com/why-dont-the-amish-get-cancer/

Report abuse
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite
Prodovite

    Comments

    Your Comments
    Question Razz Sad Evil Exclaim Smile Redface Biggrin Surprised Eek Confused Cool LOL Mad Twisted Rolleyes Wink Idea Arrow Neutral Cry Mr. Green

    Total 12 comments
    • David Gordon

      Also no autism – and no vaccines. They are not accepting the intentional poisons.

    • doggy do

      false as false can be, but what does one expect from BIS?

      Amish Have Lower Rates Of Cancer, Ohio State Study Shows

      COLUMBUS, Ohio – When Ohio State University cancer researchers first began studying a large sect of Amish living in Ohio, they theorized they would find higher incidence rates of cancer. That’s because Amish religious beliefs and traditions limit contact with mainstream society, and intermarriage within this relatively small population could increase the incidence of cancer-related gene mutations.

      Instead, they found just the opposite, said Dr. Judith Westman, division director of Human Genetics at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James).

      The study of Amish suggests that clean living can lead to healthier life. Overall cancer rates in this population were 60 percent of the age-adjusted rate for Ohio and 56 percent of the national rate. The incidence of tobacco-related cancers in the Amish adults was 37 percent of the rate for Ohio adults, and the incidence of non-tobacco-related cancer was 72 percent.

      “The Amish are at an increased risk for a number of genetic disorders but they probably have protection against many types of cancer both through their lifestyle – there is very little tobacco or alcohol use and limited sexual partners – and through genes that may reduce their susceptibility to cancer,” said Westman, who co-authored the study with OSUCCC-James researcher Amy K. Ferketich, who specializes in epidemiology.

      The findings were reported in a recent issue of the journal Cancer Causes & Control. The study, which spanned 1996-2003 and is the first of its kind, looked at the incidence of 24 types of cancer in the Amish population. Of the 24 types of cancer studied, the incidence of seven of them – cervical, laryngeal, lung, oral cavity/pharyngeal, melanoma, breast and prostate – was l

    • Williams

      The Way to Good Health :- http://jahtruth.net/heal.htm

    • Gryphon

      The Amish don’t watch television.
      And they don’t consume refined sugar (a man-made product) which is guaranteed to kill you!
      All of the typical insouciant public sitting in front of their TVs drinking their liquid candy believe that what they are doing is ‘normal’…

    • 2QIK4U

      They don’t get anything! They don’t get Internet or TV, they don’t get Sex, they don’t get Alcahol, they don’t get the Planet. :idea: SCREW BEING AMISH !

    • barebones

      Hallelujah!

    • Before It Was All Pop Ups

      Doesn’t anybody find it incredibly incongruent that medical science and the governments have such hard-ons to force vaccines down your throat for your own protection yet do nothing to prevent harmful products or byproducts from being consumed in society?

      People are getting stupider, more docile and apathetic, and far more trusting of governments than they should be. They are also dying of obesity, diabetes, cancer, and malnutrition and not polio, mumps, or the flu.

      And the internet hysteria and vitriolic abuse hurled at those who don’t trust vaccines is especially suspicious.

    • Pink Slime

      I know they don’t eat doughnuts. :lol:

    • doggy do

      he various vaccine manufactroversies that have spread in the wake of the Andrew Wakefield’s bogus claims that the measles component of the MMR vaccine might be linked to autism are too numerous to unpack in one brief blog post. One of the most persistent has been the Amish fallacy: Most Amish don’t vaccinate; there’s almost no record of autism in Amish communities; ergo, vaccines cause autism. (This argument has also been used, time and time and time again, to illustrate the efficacy of a proposed vaccinated-versus-unvaccinated study.)

      Not surprisingly, no part of the Amish fallacy — which has been kicking around for over a decade and gained new prominence and attention with this, purely anecdotal 2005 dispatch* — is true. Over the years, Ken Reibel at Autism News Beat has documented the problems with the Amish report, although the myth still persists.

      Yesterday, Reuters Health reported on a recent study in Pediatrics titled “Underimmunization in Ohio’s Amish: Parental Fears Are a Greater Obstacle Than Access to Care.” The study found that majority of Amish parents do, in fact, vaccinate their children…and among the minority that don’t, the most common reasons cited were the same anti-vaccine fueled fears that have infected people around the country.

      Unlike the theories propagated by anti-vaccine activists, this study was definitely not anecdotal: It was based on surveys sent to hundreds of families in Holmes County, which has a large number of Amish families. As Reuters reports, “Of 359 households that responded to the survey, 85 percent said that at least some of their children had received at least one vaccine. Forty-nine families refused all vaccines for their children, mostly because they worried the vaccines could cause harm and were not worth the risk.”

      The study’s conclusions summarize the issue quite succinctly:

      The reasons that Amish parents resist immunizations mirror reasons that non-Amish parents resist immunizations. Even in America’s closed religious communities, the major barrier to vaccination is concern over adverse effects of vaccinations. If 85% of Amish parents surveyed accept some immunizations, they are a dynamic group that may be influenced to accept preventative care. Underimmunization in the Amish population must be approached with emphasis on changing parental perceptions of vaccines in addition to ensuring access to vaccines.

      It’ll be interesting to see how this plays out in the days to come…and what objections will be raised to invalidate this latest piece of evidence.

      * Correction: In the first iteration of this post, I attributed the Amish-don’t-vaccinate myth to the 2005 UPI dispatch linked to above; as was pointed out in the comments, it has been kicking around since at least 2000.

    • 2QIK4U

      correction. They do understand nature, They don’t get the REST of the Planet.

    • David Gordon

      60 vax jabs by age 16. Even the Amish in your note would tolerate nothing near that. Ergo less vax – less retardation. Not just Wakefield – Thomson’s accusations of malpractice are irrefutable. Funny how all pro-vax arguments come in the form of an insult. The only ones achieving immunity with vax programs are the companies who make them. Also, you forgot the “T” on your paste-in.

    • W. Willow

      judging by the number of children they do understand the same as the birds and the bees

    SignUp

    Login

    Newsletter

    Email this story
    Email this story

    If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

    If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.