Visitors Now:
Total Visits:
Total Stories:
Profile image
By The Daily Sheeple
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

California Shield Laws Conceal Officer History and Internal Affairs Investigations

Thursday, November 17, 2016 10:40
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)

confidential-files

California has some of the worst shield laws in the country. These laws are written to indefinitely conceal officer records from the public view when officers are investigated for misconduct or disciplinary actions are taken against them.

Former police officer Noah Winchester was placed on indefinite leave from the San Mateo Police Department last October. Under California law, police chief Susan Manheimer is not legally permitted to say why.

However, 9 months later, the information was made public anyway. Attorney Steve Wagstaffe charged officer Winchester with raping five women while he was in uniform.

Explaining how he was able to speak about evidence of officer Winchester’s sexual assaults and other criminal acts while the police chief was legally prohibited from speaking about the very same evidence, Wagstaffe explained, “Chief Manheimer in the Winchester case was not able to say what I was able to say.”

This causes problems for departments who want to inquire into an officer’s history, and often leads to officers who were fired after committed criminal acts being rehired at another department, without the their new employer being aware of their history.

When the San Mateo Police Department hired Winchester, they had no idea about previous allegations of rape against him while he was a school cop at a community college near Sacramento.

“Had we had any knowledge of any sexual misconduct or allegations of sexual misconduct from anyone that we were doing a background [investigation] we would never have hired them.”

Winchester’s attorney Mike Rains thinks that these criminal acts should be kept under a tight seal, and that officers who commit criminal acts should continue to be protected by these shield laws.

“There is this movement to now make public the results of these investigations,” said Rains. “I have a real problem with that.”

Why would a defense attorney with an advanced university degree want criminally deviant officers to be protected from scrutiny and continue to be hired by other departments, perpetuating the cycle?

I’ll tell you why. Criminals in high places protect their own.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

We encourage you to share and republish our reports, analyses, breaking news and videos (Click for details).


Contributed by The Daily Sheeple of www.TheDailySheeple.com.

This content may be freely reproduced in full or in part in digital form with full attribution to the author and a link to www.TheDailySheeple.com.

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.