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Minnesota Police Leak Death Pics of Prince – Also Leak Interview Saying He Abused Women

Friday, April 20, 2018 16:23
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Prosecutor announces they won’t file charges in death of Prince Prince_Attack

The legendary music artist Prince is coming under ATTACK – a few years after his death.

A series of new reports, and images are DRAGGING Prince’s name through the mud – and disrespecting him as an artist, and as a HUMAN BEING. And they’re all a result of new information LEAKED by the Minnesota police.

Here is the First Pic

Here is the Second Pic

Here is the Third Pic

Here is the Fourth Pic

Its an interesting time to LEAK such SCANDALOUS information about Prince. A new report last week showed that his family has received ALMOST NONE any of the legendary artist’s fortune.

Two new reports have just broken. First multiple news sources have leaked Prince’s DEATH PIC. The image shows Prince lying DEAD inside his home in Minnesota.

But there’s more. The Minnesota police released a police interview of his former friend Sinead O’Connor. In the video, Sinead O’Connor claims that Prince did hard drugs, and beat women. Here’s what she said:

Sinead said, “I know this because I spent time with the man.” She recalls it wasn’t a pleasant experience, and claimed Prince “had been violent to a number of women in his life” … some of whom she claims had to be hospitalized.

Here are some images from Prince’s home:

Death_Pics

Death_Pics1

Death_Pics3

Death_Pics4

  • Images and video have been released from inside Prince’s Paisley Park compound after the singer’s death on April 21, 2016
  •  
  • The Carver County Sheriff’s Department also released video taken at a nearby Walgreen’s that shows Prince’s assistant filling two prescriptions within hours
  •  
  • Images of the home show the singer’s vault contained shelf after shelf of private documents, files and even drugs – including a zip locked bag had the word ‘opium’ scrawled across it in black marker pen
  •  
  • A small suitcase offered a glimpse of life at the home; a wad of cash, two bottles of pills, and a box of hair dye
  •  
  • Many of the walls of the house are festooned with Prince’s achievements, such as these columns which feature some of his best selling albums 

A chilling video taken inside Prince‘s Paisley Park compound moments after his body was found has been released by cops alongside multiple photos which show bottles of drugs, wads of cash and personal belongings piled up in the compound where he spent his last days holed up.

The footage reveals a home festooned in the singer’s achievements, yet strangely lacking of many personal touches, such as photos of friends or family.

Sadly, it also revealed Prince’s battle with drugs, with pill bottles found scattered throughout the multi-million dollar home, where he had lived for almost all of his adult life, along with a vault full of files, drugs and cash.

The investigators’ video, was taken moments after the singer’s body was discovered at an elevator on the ground floor of the compound on April 21, 2016. The investigators’ footage showed Prince’s body laying on the ground which DailyMail.com has chosen not to show. An autopsy later found that he had died from an accidental drugs overdose.

The images and video of the 57-year-old’s final days were released on the same day that officials announced no criminal charges would be pursued in the singer’s death. 

One set of photos show a messy dresser full of beauty products and make up, revealing the 57-year-old’s obsession with appearing young and beautiful.  

Haunting images show the inside of Prince's Paisley Park compound after he overdosed on Fentanyl

Haunting images show the inside of Prince’s Paisley Park compound after he overdosed on Fentanyl

The singer's vault contained shelf after shelf of private documents, files and even drugs 

The singer’s vault contained shelf after shelf of private documents, files and even drugs 

One zip locked bag had the word 'opium' scrawled across it in black marker pen

One zip locked bag had the word ‘opium’ scrawled across it in black marker pen

A small suitcase offers a glimpse of life at the home; a wad of cash, two bottles of pills, and a box of hair dye

A small suitcase offers a glimpse of life at the home; a wad of cash, two bottles of pills, and a box of hair dye

Images released by the Midwest Medical Examiner's office show bottles of pills that were found in Prince's residence

Images released by the Midwest Medical Examiner’s office show bottles of pills that were found in Prince’s residence

These containers of pills were also found on the singer's vast estate where he died on April 21. They were prescribed to Prince's friend Kirk Johnson

These containers of pills were also found on the singer’s vast estate where he died on April 21. They were prescribed to Prince’s friend Kirk Johnson

The counter was stock full of expensive moisturizing creams such as La Mer which sells for hundreds of dollars, as well as an array of other products such as exfoliators and cover up makeup. A box of hair dye could be seen sat atop a full carry case which also featured a bundle of cash and jars of pills. 

He also had numerous boxes of vitamins and supplements, while a list, which appears to have been written by one of Prince’s doctors, set out a regime of drugs and supplements for stress and weight loss.

The legendary performer’s iconic style can also be seen reflected throughout his home, with heavenly themed murals and even a pair of eyes watching over the house from above. His symbol, which Prince famously once demanded he only be referred to as, was also represented all over the Paisley Park mansion, from murals and artwork, to a giant symbol on the floor of the main entertaining space. 

A shoe rack in another room reveals just a fraction of Prince’s glamorous shoe collection, featuring dozens of high heels, glittery gold and silver footwear.

Pictures of Prince feature all over the house, with entire doors covered with his different looks throughout the decades, while his many accolades, awards and gold and platinum were dotted around the hallways and rooms.

The video also showed some of Prince’s idiosyncrasies. On one desk, among the piles of cash, sat a Bible and a dictionary and thesaurus, as well as what appears to be some hand painted artwork.

Another picture showed a pile of white powder on a desk, next to a silver spoon, on a desk. It is not clear what the substance is

Another picture showed a pile of white powder on a desk, next to a silver spoon, on a desk. It is not clear what the substance is

The singer also had an array of different vitamins and supplements he took on a daily basis

The singer also had an array of different vitamins and supplements he took on a daily basis

A desk is covered with artwork, next to a Bible and a dictionary, as well as a random assortment of cash, electronics and even a floppy disk 

A desk is covered with artwork, next to a Bible and a dictionary, as well as a random assortment of cash, electronics and even a floppy disk 

Another picture showed a pile of white powder on a desk, next to a silver spoon, on a desk, while investigators also found what appears to be the singer’s local library card.

The footage and photos paint a picture of an aging, isolated performer, whose life had come to revolve around drugs. 

Officials said that their investigation into the singer’s death was not able to conclusively determine who had supplied Prince with the fentanyl-laced pills that resulted in his fatal overdose.

The investigation did reveal however that Prince himself had no idea the pills contained Fentanyl, with officials stating that the singer thought he was taking Vicodin in the days and weeks leading up to his death.

This would suggest that neither Prince or those close to him knew that he was addicted to Fentanyl at the time of his death.

Prince died of a self-administered Fentanyl overdose according to an autopsy report released by the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office. 

A shoe rack displays some of the famously short singer's eclectic taste in shoes. Many are heeled, and are metallic or glittery 

A shoe rack displays some of the famously short singer’s eclectic taste in shoes. Many are heeled, and are metallic or glittery 

Prince's makeup station, which was left messy and covered in an array of beauty products, show some of the work that went into making Prince, Prince. Products include the pricey La Mer lotion, Mac make up and the more everyday St Ives scrub

Prince’s makeup station, which was left messy and covered in an array of beauty products, shows some of the work that went into making Prince, Prince. Products include the pricey La Mer lotion, Mac make up and the more everyday St Ives scrub

The home included touching reminders that, aside from his wealth and fame, Prince was like anyone else. In this picture, the singer's local library card is shown

The home included touching reminders that, aside from his wealth and fame, Prince was like anyone else. In this picture, the singer’s local library card is shown

Investigators went through Prince's personal computers and laptops after he died from the accidential overdose 

Investigators went through Prince’s personal computers and laptops after he died from the accidential overdose 

A note was found at the house, which recommends a mixture of stress relieving and fat burning drugs and remedies. One L-Tyrosine tablet was prescribed once in the morning, for stress, two Myocalm - bioavailable forms of calcium and magnesium which affect muscle contraction and relaxation, were to be taken in the evening, along with two Rhodiola, also known as 'golden root,' a herb with fat-burning and energy-enhancing properties

A note was found at the house, which recommends a mixture of stress relieving and fat burning drugs and remedies. One L-Tyrosine tablet was prescribed once in the morning, for stress, two Myocalm – bioavailable forms of calcium and magnesium which affect muscle contraction and relaxation, were to be taken in the evening, along with two Rhodiola, also known as ‘golden root,’ a herb with fat-burning and energy-enhancing properties

Investigators recovered a vast array of different drugs from Prince's home in April 2016 

Investigators recovered a vast array of different drugs from Prince’s home in April 2016 

A clear plastic bag lies out on the table, showing at least four different types of pills 

A clear plastic bag lies out on the table, showing at least four different types of pills 

Another photo shoes investigators opening up a blue ziplock bag which has $5,400 of cash stuffed inside it

Another photo shoes investigators opening up a blue ziplock bag which has $5,400 of cash stuffed inside it

A publication on the treatment of pain by Prince's other doctor, Howard Kornfeld MD, was also recovered from the home

A publication on the treatment of pain by Prince’s other doctor, Howard Kornfeld MD, was also recovered from the home

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Paisley Park Employees Detail Location and Contents of Prince’s Vault

  • No criminal charges will be filed in the April 2016 death of Prince 
  •  
  • The doctor who prescribed Prince opioid painkillers just before his death will pay a $30,000 fine 
  •  
  • Officials revealed on Thursday that they were not able to conclusively determine who had supplied Prince with Fentanyl-laced pills
  •  
  • It was also revealed that Prince himself was unaware that he was taking Fentnayl in the days and weeks prior to his death, thinking the pills were Vicodin 
  •  
  • This would suggest that neither Prince or those close to him knew that he was addicted to Fentanyl at the time of his death 

It was announced on Thursday that no criminal charges would be filed in the death of Prince, two years after he lost his life following a fatal overdose.  

Officials announced on Thursday that their investigation into the singer’s death was not able to conclusively determine who had supplied Prince with the fentanyl-laced pills that resulted in his fatal overdose.

The investigation did reveal however that Prince himself had no idea the pills contained Fentanyl, with officials stating that the singer thought he was taking Vicodin in the days and weeks leading up to his death. 

This would suggest that neither Prince or those close to him knew that he was addicted to Fentanyl at the time of his death. 

Prince died of a self-administered Fentanyl overdose according to an autopsy report released by the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office.

The 57-year-old singer’s death was ruled an accident, and the only listed cause on the medical examiner’s report was ‘Fentanyl toxicity’.

It is unclear if that autopsy report will be edited in the wake of this new information. 

Gone too soon: The doctor who prescribed Prince opioid painkillers just before his death will pay a $30,000 fine

Gone too soon: The doctor who prescribed Prince opioid painkillers just before his death will pay a $30,000 fine

Prosecutor announces they won’t file charges in death of Prince

The Minnesota doctor who is accused of illegally prescribing an opioid painkiller for Prince just one week before the musician died has agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation.

 Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg agreed to the settlement with the US Attorney’s Office, while others who cared for the singer are still waiting to see if state prosecutors file any criminal charges following their two-year investigation into the Prince’s death.

‘To actively charge a crime requires probable cause and a reasonable likelihood of conviction. The bottom line is that we simply do not have sufficient evidence to charge anyone with a crime related to Prince’s death,’ said Mark Metz, the Carver County attorney on Thursday. 

Prince’s autopsy revealed that the 5ft 3in singer weighed just 112lbs at the time of his death, and that he was dressed entirely in black (cap, pants, shirt, socks and boxer briefs) when his unresponsive body was discovered on April 21 inside an elevator at his Paisley Park estate just outside Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Prince’s former drug dealer believed opioids were behind the singer’s death when he spoke exclusively to the DailyMail

He also revealed that the performer would spend up to $40,000 on six-month supplies of two drugs – Dilaudid pills and Fentanyl patches. 

Prince’s dealer – who asked to be identified as Doctor D – said that he sold drugs to Prince from 1984 to 2008 and described the singer as ‘majorly addicted’.

He sold him the drugs he explained because Prince was too afraid of doctors to obtain a prescription, but also had stage fright and needed them to get out and perform on stage.

‘I first met Prince in 1984 while he was filming the movie Purple Rain and he was already majorly addicted to opiates – I didn’t hook him on drugs he was already a really heavy user,’ said Doctor D.

‘In the beginning he would buy speed as well as Dilaudid. I would sell him black beauties which were a black pill and cross tops which were also speed pills.

'The bottom line is that we simply do not have sufficient evidence to charge anyone with a crime related to Prince's death,' said Mark Metz

‘The bottom line is that we simply do not have sufficient evidence to charge anyone with a crime related to Prince’s death,’ said Mark Metz

‘He would use that as a counter balance to get back up again from taking opiates.That lasted for a couple of years then he would just buy Dilaudid, which is a heroin based opiate. It is highly addictive.

‘As far as I knew he never took heroin – as that would leave you out of it for days whereas Dilaudid gives you an energy buzz as well as making you feel relaxed – so he preferred it.’

He went on to say about Prince: ‘He needed the drugs because he was so nervous – he could be nervous in a room with just five people in it.

‘He was scared to go out in public, he was scared to talk to people and didn’t like to go on stage – he had the worst case of stage fright I’d ever seen.

‘A lot of performers rely on drugs to make them feel confident on stage but he was by far the worse.

‘Plus he was always paranoid about doctors so he wouldn’t ask them for help – he had a phobia of them.

‘I was surprised when I heard he had been picking up prescriptions before he died.’ 

Doctor D also seemed to think that if Prince had been prescribed Percocet by a doctor that could have caused his death, suggesting that even Diludid would have been a safer choice for the singer.

It was reported shortly after Prince’s death that the highly addictive painkiller Percocet – which contains both acetaminophen and oxycodone – had been found in his system.

There were also reports around that time claiming Prince had been treated for an overdose of Percocet just six days before his death.

‘If Prince was just taking Dilaudid he would still be alive,’ he said.

‘It has less side effects than other opiate drugs such as Percocet but doctors don’t like to prescribe it because it’s one of the heaviest drugs.

‘The problem with Percocet is that it is an opiate mixed with Tylenol – but he would have been taking much more than the recommended dose because he had developed a tolerance to opiates over the years.

‘When you take that much Tylenol it can cause major problems – especially with your kidneys.

‘But doctors would have freaked out if they knew the extent of Prince’s drug problem and wouldn’t know what to do.’

He added about the singer: ‘He self medicated for years and was fine – so it wouldn’t have been the opiates that killed him but the Tylenol.

‘So perversely the doctors who thought they were helping him may have hurt him by prescribing Percocet.

‘Also if they did have to give him a save shot when he overdosed like everybody is saying – that removes all traces of drugs from your system so he would have started to go into withdrawal and would have had to take a lot of drugs to feel okay again – which also could have killed him.

‘You can’t just stop taking these drugs when you have taken them for so long.

‘But without knowing his drug history doctors wouldn’t have known that.

‘It explains why he was spotted looking nervous and pacing around at the pharmacy in the week before his death.’

Officials had said that the main reason the federal authorities had been brought in was so the investigation could cover the multiple states Prince had visited in the weeks before his death.

Prince’s private jet made an emergency landing in Moline, Illinois, six days before he died so he could be rushed to hospital.

The singer, who was flying from a show in Atlanta, was treated for flu and did not stay the night at the hospital.

He appeared at a dance party in Minnesota just days before his death to let his fans know he was recovering, telling them: ‘Wait a few days before you waste any prayers.’

Prince was last pictured the night before his death leaving a Walgreen’s near his home around 7pm, marking the fourth time the singer had been to the pharmacy that week.

An hour later, he headed back inside his vast estate and 13 hours later he was found by friend Kirk Johnson and personal assistant Meron Bekure lying unresponsive in an elevator.

Paramedics performed CPR upon arriving on the scene five minutes after receiving a 911 call but were not successful in reviving the singer.

Officials later stated that the singer was likely dead for approximately six hours before his body was found.

An autopsy was performed the following day.

The day before Prince died, his representatives reached out to California doctor Dr Howard Kornfeld to arrange a meeting according to a lawyer for the doctor.

Attorney William Mauzy said Dr Kornfeld had never met or spoken to Prince before Prince’s representatives contacted him on April 20.

Mauzy said Dr Kornfeld was not able to travel immediately to Minnesota, so he arranged for his son Andrew to go instead.

Andrew Kornfeld took a late flight on April 20 so he could be at Prince’s Paisley Park studio complex the next morning. When he got there, he was with Johnson and Burke when they found Prince in the elevator, and it was he who called 911. 

Mauzy said Andrew was carrying a small amount of buprenorphine, which is used to treat addiction and offers pain relief with less possibility of overdose and addiction.

He added that Andrew never intended to give the medication to Prince, and instead planned to give it to the Minnesota doctor who was scheduled to see Prince.

The identity of that doctor is still not known at this time.

Mauzy also said the elder Kornfeld arranged for a Minnesota doctor to evaluate Prince, and that the doctor had cleared his schedule for the following morning but Prince was found unresponsive before that could happen.

‘Dr. Kornfeld was never able to meet Prince, never talked to Prince, and sadly, unable to arrive in time to help Prince,’ Mauzy told reporters.

When asked about the legality of his carrying buprenorphine, Mauzy declined to answer. But he said he believed Minnesota law would protect Andrew from any potential charges related to Prince’s death.

Under the law, a person who seeks medical assistance for someone who is overdosing on drugs may not be prosecuted for possessing or sharing controlled substances, under certain circumstances.

Mauzy said it was not uncommon for Dr Kornfeld to send his son on his behalf.

He said Andrew is a pre-med student and that convincing people to seek treatment is something ‘he has done for years’.

The same official also said investigators are looking at whether Prince had suffered an overdose when his plane made the emergency landing in Illinois.

Dr Kornfeld runs Recovery Without Walls in Mill Valley, California. His website describes the practice as ‘specializing in innovative, evidence-based medical treatment for chronic pain and drug and alcohol addiction’.

Andrew is listed on the website as a practice consultant.

Mauzy said Prince’s representatives told Dr Kornfeld that the singer was ‘dealing with a grave medical emergency’, however the doctor did not explain what the issue was.

Mauzy said Dr Kornfeld hoped to get Prince ‘stabilized in Minnesota and convince him to come to Recovery Without Walls in Mill Valley. That was the plan’.

Stuart Gitlow, an addiction medicine expert speaking without direct knowledge of Prince’s case, questioned whether Dr Kornfeld and his son acted appropriately.

‘If a physician feels that a patient is having an emergency, his obligation is to call an ambulance and get the patient to emergency personnel who can assess the situation — not to fly to the patient,’ Gitlow said.

‘It’s not routine for doctors to fly across the country to start people on buprenorphine,’ said Gitlow, a past president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and a faculty member of the University of Florida.

‘That’s something that can be handled locally.’

Prince, who over the course of his career won seven Grammy Awards, seemed to live a remarkably healthy life, having been a strict vegan for over a decade and becoming a Jehovah’s Witness in 2001, a faith that largely prohibits the consumption of alcohol.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Prince’s reggae track finds new life {AUDIO}

Recording studio inside of Paisley Park

Recording studio inside of Paisley Park

 

*Former Paisley Park employee Scott LeGere is one of the rare people on earth who have experienced “the vault,” Prince’s vast storage area holding an untold amount of his unreleased material.

LeGere, who began working at the facility about a decade ago, gave Rolling Stone a detailed description of the space, and how music ended up being filed inside.

It all started, LeGere explained, with Prince laying down the tracks. “He’d be tracking drums in Studio A, horns in Studio B, and doing writing and preproduction with somebody else in Studio C,” says LeGere. “He’d just hop.”

When he finished, Prince would either release the results on record, or lose interest in what he’d done and store the tapes in floor-to-ceiling shelves inside the vault.

Tucked away in the basement of Paisley Park, the vault lived up to its name: Accessible by elevator, it was (and still is) a climate-controlled room hidden behind a steel door straight out a bank, complete with a time lock and large spinning handle. For an extra dash of mystique, only Prince had the combination, and many employees respected that decision. “At one point, I was holding tapes and he would beckon me to come in,” says LeGere. “I said, ‘Actually, sir, I’d rather not. That is your space and your work – I will simply hand these things to you.’ He seemed to appreciate that. I think that’s what quite a few other staff did.”

According to past Paisley Park employees, thousands of hours of unheard live and studio material – jams, random songs and entire albums – still reside in that locked room, along with a similar amount of performance footage. (LeGere recalls stepping into the “pre-vault” – a small, foyer-like room that lead to the archive – and finding the floor covered with tape reels, which meant the main vault was full a decade ago.) How many of those tapes have been adequately logged and catalogued remains a mystery; some employees don’t remember seeing much in the way of detailed lists. “Half the time I couldn’t find a song because it was so hard to find,” says engineer Ian Boxill, who worked with Prince during the second half of last decade. “I’d spend a half hour just going through tapes. Prince didn’t seem to have a reaction to it. I’d be like, ‘Wow, look at all this stuff,’ especially when I saw a lot of Batman tapes. For him, it was like going through old filing cabinets.”

Now and then, Prince burrowed into that archive, releasing entire albums from it (The Black Album) or gathering tracks for later collections like Crystal Ball, Lotusflower and The Vault: Old Friends 4 Sale.

Rolling Stone asked Paisley Park veterans to reveal what other treasures may exist among the vast amount of recordings in the vault. Here are just a few:

The Second Coming (1982): Live album from the fiery Controversy tour, taped during a homecoming show in March 1982 and capturing Prince and his band – including guitarist Dez Dickerson – romping through salacious early classics like “Jack U Off” and “Dirty Mind.”

“In a Large Room With No Light” (1986): Cut with Wendy and Lisa, Sheila E., guitarist Levi Seacer Jr. and other musicians, this ebullient, zigzagging track was to be included on the unrealized Dream Factory album with the Revolution. “It was a period when he was doing a lot of jazz-informed stuff – not jazz but you could tell he had been listening to it,” recalls former tour manager Alan Leeds. “It was a really interesting song.” Prince re-recorded the song himself in 2009, but the original remains in the vault.

The Flesh: Junk Music (1985-6): For several days, Prince jammed on freeform instrumentals with Sheila E., Wendy and Lisa, sax man Eric Leeds, and other players. “Prince was all over the studio, playing guitar, bass and drums,” recalls Leeds. “He would just call out a key and start playing, and sometime he would do impromptu scats. It was amazing, fun stuff.” Although Prince considered releasing the album incognito as the Flesh, with no band members listed, he changed his mind and shelved it in favor of other projects.

 

prince, prince unreleased music, prince vault, prince recordings

Prince insiders discuss some of the many unreleased recordings stored in the Paisley Park vault. 

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Since Prince’s death on April 21, there has been renewed interest in the singer/songwriter’s music. Sales of his albums and singles have shot past the three-million mark.

Seventeen Prince albums have re-entered the Billboard 200 Albums chart. One of them is Love Symbol, which is currently at number 111.

Love Symbol, his 14th album, was released October 13 1992 by Paisley Park/Warner Bros. Among the set’s 18 songs is the reggae track Blue Light.

Blue Light samples Bob Marley’s Is This Love. Musicians who worked on the song include saxophonist Eric Leeds and bassist Michael Koppelman.

Love Symbol peaked at number five on the Billboard 200 Albums chart. It has sold over one million copies in the United States and five million copies worldwide.

The songs from the album that did well chart-wise were 7My Name is Prince, Sexy MF and The Morning Papers.

 

 

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    A Fool and his money will soon depart.

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