Profile image
By Alton Parrish (Reporter)
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

Women Feel More Pain Than Men, Require Different Pain Therapies

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 14:01
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)

A female brain’s resident immune cells are more active in regions involved in pain processing relative to males, according to a recent study by Georgia State University researchers.

The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found that when microglia, the brain’s resident immune cells, were blocked, female response to opioid pain medication improved and matched the levels of pain relief normally seen in males.

Women suffer from a higher incidence of chronic and inflammatory pain conditions such as fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis. While morphine continues to be one of the primary drugs used for the treatment of severe or chronic pain, it is often less effective in females.

Credit:  Georgia State University

“Indeed, both clinical and preclinical studies report that females require almost twice as much morphine as males to produce comparable pain relief,” said Hillary Doyle, graduate student in the Murphy Laboratory in the Neuroscience Institute of Georgia State. “Our research team examined a potential explanation for this phenomenon, the sex differences in brain microglia.”

In healthy individuals, microglia survey the brain, looking for signs of infection or pathogens. In the absence of pain, morphine interferes with normal body function and is viewed as a pathogen, activating the brain’s innate immune cells and causing the release of inflammatory chemicals such as cytokines.

To test how this sex difference affects morphine analgesia, Doyle gave male and female rats a drug that inhibits microglia activation.

“The results of the study have important implications for the treatment of pain, and suggests that microglia may be an important drug target to improve opioid pain relief in women,” said Dr. Anne Murphy, co-author on the study and associate professor in the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State.

The research team’s finding that microglia are more active in brain regions involved in pain processing may contribute to why the incidence rates for various chronic pain syndromes are significantly higher in females than males.

 
 
Contacts and sources:
Brian Mullen
Georgia State University
 
Citation: Sex Differences in Microglia Activity within the Periaqueductal Gray of the Rat: A Potential Mechanism Driving the Dimorphic Effects of Morphine
H.H. Doyle, L.N. Eidson, D.M. Sinkiewicz and A.Z. Murphy
Journal of Neuroscience 20 February 2017, 2906-16; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2906-.2017 



Source:

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories
 

Featured

 

Top Global

 

Top Alternative

 

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.