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HOUSTON — Prayer Action Opposing Dakota Access and Trans Pecos Pipelines

Sunday, October 16, 2016 20:27
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(Before It's News)

Oil-impacted communities from across the country descend on Energy Transfer Partners in Houston in Solidarity with Standing Rock
#NoDAPL actions spread across the country following Indigenous Peoples
Houston—Grassroots leaders from oil and energy-impacted communities across the country will gather at the Houston offices of Energy Transfer Partners for a prayer action in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and thousands of water defenders mobilizing against the Dakota Access Pipeline. In one of the largest environmental justice mobilizations in history, Standing Rock water defenders have drawn together more than 5,000 people representing over 280 Indigenous Nations and Tribes and forced a federal injunction against one of the largest oil pipeline projects in North America. Energy Transfer Partners has drawn national attention for driving both the Dakota Access Pipeline and the equally controversial Trans Pecos Pipeline, that has also violated the rights of Indigenous Peoples in West Texas, and poses significant threat to the water and land for many communities in Texas.

What: Prayer Action Opposing both the Dakota Access and the Trans Pecos Pipelines
Where: Energy Transfer Partners, 1300 South Main Street, Houston, TX 77002
When: 1:30pm on Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Who: Environmental and Climate Justice Organizations Across the Country.
The Trans Pecos & the Comanche Trail Pipelines are being constructed to transport huge amounts of natural gas through the pristine Big Bend region under the sacred Rio Grande & into Mexico. Energy-impacted communities from Richmond CA, Chicago, Kentucky, Arizona, the Gulf Coast, New York, New Jersey, and national environmental organizations are all aligning with local organizers in Texas to oppose both the Trans Pecos Pipeline and Dakota Access Pipeline and call for a Just Transition to renewable energy alternatives.
“Clean water is a basic human right that should be afforded to everyone. No treaty, law or structure should have to reinforce a necessity, yet we understand that we live in a world driven by corporate greed that sacrifices sacred lands, vulnerable populations and people of color. I am humbled by the solidarity and courage grassroots, big greens and supporting organizations from all over the country are demonstrating to face Energy Transfer Partners at their doorstep in the house of the largest petrochemical complex of the nation. Together we press forward, rise and demand a clean world for future generations in our struggle to survive.” – Yvette Arellano, T.E.J.A.S.
“It gives me great pleasure to see the networking that has arisen from finally deprogramming from forced and coerced corporate dependency on oil; to recognize the importance of Native Original People of Texas (NOPOT) as the intricate thread in holding accountable the oil super PACs for the destruction of humanity through the pollution of the four elements of life: Water, Air, Earth, and Fire. Please join us in this walk of sending our voices for Mother Earth. We call on the criminal Kelsey Warren and Energy Transfer Partners to stop the cycle of Genocide of NOPOT and Texas Tribal Ancestors by ending the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Trans Pecos Pipeline and the Comanche Trail Pipeline. AH'E YA'T PAYESE'L. Water is life!!” – Juan Mancias, Tribal Chairman, Carrizo/Comecrudo Tribe of Texas
““From Chicago to Houston we stand with all of our communities impacted by the oil and gas industry in fighting back. It took us twelve years to shut down the two coal plant in Chicago and we commit to fighting until our communities have justice. While these companies think they have only money and stocks to lose we have to remind them it's our lives and world at stake.” – Kim Wasserman, Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), Chicago
“The fossil fuel industry and their financiers have desecrated our land and communities for decades, deeming communities of color and poor communities sacrificial in their conquest for profit. Today they threaten our collective futures from the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline in ND to the Trans Pecos Pipeline in Texas. Yet, our universities remain invested in this violent industry. We stand with the Water Protectors and support the calls for divestment from Energy Transfer Partners and the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Divestment Student Network stands with Standing Rock for the protection of life, dignity, and self-determination.” – Jess Grady-Benson, Divestment Student Network
“The Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives stands in solidarity with the indigenous freedom fighters and allies from Standing Rock to West Texas. Our “dig, burn, dump” economy has entrenched us in an unsustainable system that we must move away from.” – Ahmina Maxey, The Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA)
“There is no way to build these pipelines that will be safe or in ‘the public interest,’ as fossil fuel companies would like you to believe. Both the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Trans-Pecos Pipeline are dirty, large-scale fossil fuel projects that will put money in the pockets of high-paid executives while exploiting black and brown communities, releasing an enormous amount of greenhouse gasses and limiting our ability to leave a healthy world behind for generations to come. We need to end this cycle by keeping fossil fuels in the ground and putting resources towards the just transition to a 100% renewable energy economy.” – Everette R. H. Thompson,
“We stand in deep solidarity with our indigenous brothers and sisters banded together to resist the Dakota Access Pipeline. Our fights are quite literally one: the Gulf South is where that Bakken crude oil will eventually end up for refining and transportation. We are already on the frontline of climate change, where natural disasters have become a tragic way of life. We are already on the frontline of environmental disasters, like the BP oil catastrophe which we are still recovering from. It is time to put an end to extractive energy production, and the exploitation of our land and labor that comes along with that. We do not want to see anyone suffer from these horrors any longer.” – Jayeesha, Dutta, Radical Arts and Healing Collective, New Orleans
Censored News:
Why is Obama silent about the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the ongoing civil rights and human rights abuses? Obama was obviously in on it from the beginning. Energy Transfer Partners needed a presidential permit for their pipeline to cross the border into Mexico, and poison the people there with fracked gas. Obama gave it to them in May. The black snake pipeline even stole another Native word for one of their poison pipelines 'Comanche.'

Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 29 years, serving as a writer for Navajo Times and a stringer for AP and USA Today during the 18 years she lived on the Navajo Nation. After being a longtime staff reporter for Indian Country Today, she was censored and terminated. She then created Censored News, focused on Indigenous Peoples and human rights, now in its fifth year.

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