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Beheaded British Aid Worker Went to Syria with Charity on Trial as a Cover for Jihad Terror Org, 3 British Muslims on Trial

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 14:38
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(Before It's News)

The take away from this trial is not just the gruesome beheading of British aid worker Allen Henning, but that he traveled to Syria with a charity that was a cover for jihad terror activity and that Hennings murder involved once “moderate” British Muslims now on trial.

ISIS didn’t just pick this poor man by happenstance. Henning went with an Islamic charity used by British Muslims as a  cover to send thousands of pounds in money and equipment to terrorists as part of a scheme to set up a team of ‘night snipers’ in Syria.

‘The defendants made use, or so it would appear, of aid convoys as a means of moving money and other property out of the United Kingdom to Syria.’

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-3-48-55-pm

It is widely known that Islamic charities are used as fronts to aid, arm and supply is Islamic terror groups.  Here in the United States one of the largest Islamic charities, the Holy Land Foundation, was convicted of jihad terror financing in what is now the largest terrorist financing trial in on nations history. Hundreds of well-known Islamic groups like CAIR, ISNA, MSA, et al  were named as unindicted co-conspirators in that trial and should have been brought to justice but the Obama administration scuttled those prosecutions.  I believe the Trump administration will pursue those prosecutions and bring these terror-tied groups to justice.

This trial proves yet agin the premise in my ground-breaking NYC bus campaign:

afdi-moderate-ad

Aid convoy that took Jihadi John hostage Alan Henning to Syria was infiltrated by fanatics who helped set up terrorist sniper team, court hears

Mr Henning went to Syria with a charity but was taken hostage and killed
Three of those linked to his convoy are now on trial at the Old Bailey
They are accused of helping a plot to start a terrorist sniper squad in Syria
The trio, from Luton, London and Yorkshire, deny the charges

By Richard Spillett, Crime Correspondent and Duncan Gardham For Mailonline, 16 November 2016

Murdered British aid worker Alan Henning was taken to Syria on a convoy linked to extremists, a court has heard.

Mr Henning, of Salford, Greater Manchester, was beheaded by ISIS executioner Jihadi John in 2014 after travelling to the Middle East in convoys with men now on trial for terror offences.

The aid convoys were allegedly used as cover to send thousands of pounds in money and equipment to terrorists as part of a scheme to set up a team of ‘night snipers’ in Syria.

Aid worker Alan Henning was taken to Syria on a convoy used by extremists, a court heard

Aid worker Alan Henning was taken to Syria on a convoy used by extremists, a court heard

Syed Hoque, 37, from Luton, Bedfordshire, allegedly sent £4,500 to Syria so that his nephew Mohammed Choudhury, could buy a sniper rifle and offered to fund a number of others.

Choudhury went to Syria in 2013 and fought for Jabhat al-Nusra, the terrorist wing of Al Qaeda in Syria, the court heard. He has never returned.

Hoque was allegedly helped by a ‘quartermaster’ called Mashoud Miah, 27, and two other men, who sourced the equipment and helped get it to Syria.

The court heard that co-defendant Pervez Rafiq, had told police he had been on a convoy arranged by a charity called al-Fatiha Global with Alan Henning in December 2013, and had taken part in an appeal for his safe return.

The court had earlier been told that Hoque and Miah had been on an earlier convoy, organised by a charity called Children in Deen, and were carrying ‘substantial amounts of cash’ when they left the country.

Prosecutor Annabel Darlow QC told the Old Bailey: ‘The defendants made use, or so it would appear, of aid convoys as a means of moving money and other property out of the United Kingdom to Syria.’

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-3-43-23-pm

Pictures allegedly sent by Choudhury to Hoque include one of a fighter with a Kalashnikov

Pictures allegedly sent by Choudhury to Hoque include one of a fighter with a Kalashnikov

Ms Darlow added: ‘The prosecution do not suggest that the aid convoys themselves did not have an overall charitable purpose, or that those participating did not intend by the provision of food and medicine to help the civilian population suffering in Syria.

‘However the convoys would have provided a useful conduit for these defendants to abuse the spirit of the convoys to convey money and property to terrorists.’

Messages between Hoque and Choudhury show them discussing extremist violence, the court heard.

In a message in February 2014, a year after his arrival in Syria, Choudhury told his uncle: ‘My desire is nothing but to destroy the kuffar [non-believers] in the most humiliating way.

‘I would lyk 2 cut der heads, wrap der heads on a car, and drag it along…Ameen…It boils my blood wen I c det faces…Dey r pigs!’

The photos said to have been exchange include an Islamic flag

 The photos said to have been exchanged include an armed pick-up truck and an Islamic flag

A photo of a Draganov sniper's rifle was also sent between the men. Prosecutors say they were attempting to help terrorists become 'night snipers'

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A photo of a Draganov sniper’s rifle was also sent between the men. Prosecutors say they were attempting to help terrorists become ‘night snipers’

Choudhury had boasted to his uncle that he was getting married to a ‘very young’ 16-year-old bride.

But Choudhury he later changed his mind after arriving in Syria and said he was too busy fighting to get married and wanted to be a martyr.

Syed Hoque faces three counts of funding terrorism after allegedly providing £3,000 and £1,500 on December 21 2013.

Along with the three other defendants, he also faces a charge that they made material available with a reasonable cause to suspect it was for terrorism between December 1 2012 and May 31 2014.

Syed Hoque, 37, from Luton; Mashoud Miah, 27, from Mile End; Mohammed Hussain, 30, also from Mile End; and Pervez Rafiq, 46, from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, all deny the charges and the trial continues.

The court heard the convoys Mr Henning was part of were charitable, but had been infiltrated

 The court heard the convoys Mr Henning was part of were charitable, but had been infiltrated

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