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A “Sanctuary Campus” in Germany

Thursday, June 8, 2017 13:58
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Nuremberg

This story is a cautionary tale of what happens when schools declare themselves “sanctuary campuses” and “safe spaces” for illegal aliens. In Nuremberg, Germany a young Afghan made threatening statements to police that he would kill Germans. When authorities showed up to pick him up for deportation at his school in Nuremberg, his fellow students tried to stop them. A riot ensued. Shockingly, the press is largely supporting the students and criticizing the police.

Below is the German description by Tichys Einblick. in German.

https://www.tichyseinblick.de/kolumnen/mueller-vogg-gegen-den-strom/ein-illegaler-migrant-droht-bei-abschiebung-mit-mord-na-und/

Here is a translation by my colleague, Egri Nok:

An illegal migrant makes a death threat at his deportation – so what?
By Hugo Müller-Vogg, Wed., June 7 2017

The arrest of an asylum seeker in a school, attempted violent hindrance, certain media outlets are praising that, and the death threat which the person to be deported made is reduced to a footnote.


In Nürnberg, police tried to arrest a 20 year old Afghan in his trade school, to deport him to his home country. Hour long riots ensued. Police had to face 300 protesters, anything but just classmates of Asef N., but also „activists“ from the radical left. The result: 5 injured policemen, 0 injured protesters, fierce criticism of the „tough operation“ of the law enforcement forces – and no deportation custody for the refused asylum seeker.
The case has got four aspects: The arrest of an asylum seeker in a school, the attempted violent hindrance, the praise of certain media outlets for the pupils who deem themselves above the law, and – last but not least – reducing the death threat that the person to be deported made to a footnote.

Police actions in a school: Nürnberg was not the first case where the law enforcement forces arrested illegal immigrants. Even when, in most cases, there were no violent riots like in Nürnberg, this approach seems out of place. Of course schools are no exterritorial grounds, even if some functionaries of the teachers’ union like to give that impression. But the police could enforce statute and law in a less noisy way, if they arrested people to be deported rather on their way to school, instead of entering school buildings. It serves no one when that disturbs and frightens younger, uninvolved pupils.

Resistance against deportations:  We are living under the rule of law. And when in doubt, courts decide who can stay and who can’t. Whether someone, due to offenses against our laws, is arrested in his apartment, at his place of work, or in a school, his family, friends and colleagues are free to be indignant about that. But club law (law of the fist, of the jungle) against an alleged injustice contradicts the very basics of the rule of law.

Praise for „Brave Citizens“: It was not the policemen of Nürnberg who broke the law but the classmates of Asef N. and their supporters from the radical left. The more astonishing is the praise by the „Süddeutschen Zeitung“ in the June 3. edition. The commenter praises the young „Brave Citizens“ (translator: „Mutbürger“, a pun at so-called „Wutbürger“, „angry citizens“, a derogative for people who criticize Merkel having come to mean as much as „Nazis“). The comment literally says: „Law abidance can not mean that the citizens have to accept every step of the executive immediately and meekly, especially, when it is as insensitive as in Nürnberg, and with such see-through political intent.“ In other words: Whoever puts himself above the law where the abuse of asylum is concerned, is a model citizen. One wonders how the SZ editors would like it if right- or left extreme protesters stopped the delivery of their paper with violence, because they don’t agree to their political directive?

A murder threat? So what! According to the Marshal of Nürnberg, Norbert Guth, Asif N. yelled at his arrest: „I will be back next month. And then I will kill Germans.“ No matter the rights and wrongs the police made in Nürnberg: An asylum seeker who threatens to return as a terrorist after his deportation has definitely forfeited his right to stay. Additionally, his actions show that a good command of German and regular school attendance alone do not prove successful integration. But in many media outlets, Asif N.’s outrageous threat shrinks to the size of a footnote – for reasons of political correctness.
SZ, who do not attempt to hide their sympathy for the young man, report the incident like this: „Should he have really said that, then he is very sorry, he declared, he must have not been in control of himself. Still, it seems the sentence was said.“ And then they quote a social pedagogue, who is full of understanding for the allegedly so exemplary integrated young Afghan: „The things that you slip (accidentally say) in existential exceptional situations, if you feel psychologically hurt“, she said. „Then you will say whatever will hurt your opponent most.“

The Seed of Sixty-Eight (translator: the year of the „student revolution“ in Germany): The Nürnberg incident happens to coincide with the 50th  „birthday“ of the extra-parliamentary opposition (APO) on June 2., 1967, the day when the student Benno Ohnesorg, who was just peacefully protesting, was shot in cold blood by a policeman in Berlin. 50 years later the liberals (Baron: the German word was linksliberal, but it describes what in America are „liberals“) praise how beneficial the APO changed the society of the federal repulic, made it more democratic and more humane.
Indeed: the protesters of Nürnberg, unknowingly, stand in the tradition of those who acted under the moniker: „legal, illegal, whatever!“ (not sure if that is a good translation? The German rhimes: „legal, illegal, scheißegal“ – „sch**egal“ means „I don’t give a sh**“. It used to be one of the monikers of the Generation of ’68). That spirit still seems very alive in some editorial offices.
———————————————————————————————————–

Here is a video of what happened without translation. It speaks for itself.

Is this what we are headed for in the US, especially in California, where colleges are declaring themselves “sanctuary spaces” for “undocumented students”?



Source: http://garyfouse.blogspot.com/2017/06/a-sanctuary-campus-in-germany.html

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