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Jim Marrs: Antarctica Military Base with Joseph Farrell (Video)

Sunday, August 13, 2017 3:28
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Jim Marrs (born December 5, 1943-August 2, 2017) is an American former newspaper journalist and New York Times best-selling author of books and articles on a wide range of alleged cover ups and conspiracies. Marrs is a prominent figure in the JFK conspiracy press and his book Crossfire was a source for Oliver Stone’s film JFK. He has written books asserting the existence of government conspiracies regarding aliens, 9/11, telepathy, and secret societies. He was once a news reporter in the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex and has taught a class on the assassination of John F. Kennedy at University of Texas at Arlington for 30 years. Marrs is a member of the Scholars for 9/11 Truth.

A native of Fort Worth, Texas, Marrs earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from the University of North Texas in 1966 and attended graduate school at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas until 1968. He has worked for several Texas newspapers, including the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, where, beginning in 1968, he served as police reporter and general assignments reporter covering stories locally, in Europe, and in the Middle East. After a leave of absence to serve with a Fourth Army intelligence unit during the Vietnam War, he became military and aerospace writer for the newspaper and an investigative reporter.

Since 1980, Marrs has been a freelance writer, author, and public relations consultant. He has also published a rural weekly newspaper along with a monthly tourism tabloid, a cable television show, and several videos.

Since 1976, Marrs has taught a course on the assassination of Kennedy at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Beginning in 1992, Marrs spent three years researching and completing a non-fiction book on a top-secret government program called the Stargate Project involving the psychic phenomenon known as remote viewing, only to have the program canceled as it was going to press in the summer of 1995.

In May 1997, Marrs’ investigation of UFOs, Alien Agenda, was published by HarperCollins Publishers. The paperback edition was released in mid-1998. It has been translated into several foreign languages and become the top-selling UFO book in the world. Publishers Weekly said:

Marrs shows little discrimination, overemphasizing dubious phenonmena like remote viewing and crop circles, and giving nearly equal weight to ludicrous pretenders like Billy Meier (who claimed close encounter with Pleiadians) and sophisticated commentators like Jaques Vallee. Marrs even devotes a chapter to theories that the moon may be a UFO, and he refuses to rule out obvious frauds like the alien autopsy tapes. But if rigorous analysis escapes Marrs, little else does; this is the most entertaining and complete overview of flying saucers and their crew in years.

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  • Eben

    “Jim Marrs (born December 5, 1943-August 2, 2017) is [sic] an American former newspaper journalist and New York Times best-selling author of books and articles on a wide range of alleged cover ups and conspiracies. Marrs is [sic] a prominent figure in the JFK conspiracy press and his book Crossfire was a source for Oliver Stone’s film JFK.”

    Jim Marrs is? I thought he was dead!

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