Visitors Now:
Total Visits:
Total Stories:
Profile image
By Alton Parrish (Reporter)
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

Who Would Have Thought Bird Poop Helps Cool The Arctic?

Friday, November 18, 2016 20:49
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)

It turns out bird ammonia rich poop helps cool the Arctic.

That’s according to new research from Colorado State University atmospheric scientists, who are working to better understand key components of Arctic climate systems.

Publishing in Nature Communications and featured by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science Jeff Pierce and graduate student Jack Kodros present evidence linking ammonia emissions from summertime Arctic seabird-colony excrement, called guano, to newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles. These particles can in turn influence Arctic cloud properties and their effects on climate.

B4INREMOTE-aHR0cHM6Ly8zLmJwLmJsb2dzcG90LmNvbS8tMURLNEtLRHN2N2MvV0NfQjhjOWFlVUkvQUFBQUFBQUJRaUUvaTFvaHJ2Uk45bEE4bVgyaDJXdnJlQ0E3OVM1Vlk1SEhRQ0xjQi9zMTYwMC9hcmN0aWNCaXJkczg3MC5qcGc=

Credit: Colorado State University

Clouds play a key role in modulating Arctic temperature; thus, understanding factors that influence clouds is essential, Pierce says. Central to the development of clouds is the availability of cloud condensation nuclei – small atmospheric particles around which water can condense.

Using a combination of observations and computer modeling, Pierce, Kodros and co-authors at Dalhousie University, University of Toronto, and Environment and Climate Change Canada determined that migratory-seabird colonies have a definitive influence on atmospheric particles and clouds in the pristine summertime Arctic.

They report the presence of summertime bursts of atmospheric particles linked to ammonia emissions from seabird-colony guano. These particles can spread throughout the Arctic, fostering cloud-droplet formation, and in turn reflect sunlight back to space for a net cooling effect.

“This newly identified and fascinating ecological-atmospheric connection highlights the interconnectedness of the many components of Earth’s climate system,” Pierce said.

 

 

Contacts and sources:
Anne Manning
Colorado State University

Citation: Contribution of Arctic seabird-colony ammonia to atmospheric particles and cloud-albedo radiative effect Authors: B. Croft, G. R. Wentworth, R. V. Martin, W. R. Leaitch, J. G. Murphy, B. N. Murphy, J. K. Kodros, J. P. D. Abbatt & J. R. Pierce Nature Communications 7, Article number: 13444 (2016) doi:10.1038/ncomms13444

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.