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The $30,000 Underground Shipping Container Home

Thursday, November 3, 2016 15:05
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How To Build An Off-Grid Home Without ANY Construction Skills

Imagine living in a home where it never gets above 80 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer – without using air conditioning. And during winter, even without heat, it’s always in the 60s.

Sound impossible? It’s not if you live in an underground shipping container home, as this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio does. His name is Steve Rees, and for $30,000 he built his dream underground home, giving him benefits that a traditional house simply does not bring.

His home is so sturdy that it easily could survive a wildfire, tornado or even hurricane.

Steve shares with us the good and the bad of living underground, and he also tells us:

  • How he uses the sun to light his home, despite being underground.
  • What he uses for electricity and water.
  • Where he bought his shipping container.
  • How he strengthened the container to withstand the pressure of dirt on top of it.

Steve’s house is so hidden that FedEx trucks have trouble finding it!

Finally, Steve tells us what he would do differently if he could start all over. If you love stories about amazing people or you ever have had thoughts of living underground, then you don’t want to miss this amazing show!

 

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  • I would question how long the vertical side walls will resist deformation due to the horizontal force by the earth upon them. As he mentioned, the containers are designed to carry vertical forces (stacking) through the corner columns not horizontal forces on the side walls. Time will tell, eh?

    • Side forces are not that high unless you go very deep underground in very unstable ground. The only real problem might be ground water level, but if you are aware of all the potential problems, choosing a suitable site with some thought and care, is not that difficult.

  • if american don’t learn to deal with there own government then they are going have to learn how to deal with fallout from nukes, lots of nukes and i am not sure that a shipping container is going to help you live more than a few months longer in the event of WWIII because the USA thinks it can use force all the time to get it’s way.

    Running to the hills like chickens won’t save many people but saying no to banker corruption using force might stop you from needing a weekend get away from the farm that we are all treated like slaves in.

    The world has a cancer and it needs removing

  • Horizontal forces do not have to be that great……you have a 9.5′ x 40′ (380 sq.ft.) wall with about 1.25″ deep corrugations in a, perhaps, 2mm (5/64″) thick steel wall that is otherwise unsupported across it’s entire surface. Yes, there is a (I believe) a 6″ layer of Styrofoam which might spread a concentrated load a bit but it is no way a monolithic wall and would do little to support the wall. The 6″ reinforced, poured concrete roof would prevent the top from caving in due to soil or other pressure above, however.

    Do a search on burying shipping containers, I think you will be surprised at how vulnerable they are to being buried without things like a poured concrete “vault” to carry the ground and other forces on them.

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