Visitors Now:
Total Visits:
Total Stories:
Profile image
By Freedom Bunker
Contributor profile | More stories
Story Views

Now:
Last Hour:
Last 24 Hours:
Total:

Are You Getting Diabetes… in Your Sleep?!?

Saturday, October 29, 2016 8:47
% of readers think this story is Fact. Add your two cents.

(Before It's News)

Dear Reader,

Maybe you snore when you sleep, or have a partner who does (a very loud French bulldog in my case).

But either way, you know what a nighttime nuisance it can be.

If you’re like lots of people, you may have ignored your snoring for years – or just figured it was an annoying side effect of deep sleep.

Unfortunately, that’s not always the case…

Snoring can be a major warning sign of a serious condition called sleep apnea, where your airway becomes partially or completely blocked during sleep.

And unless you take care of it quickly, snoring could put you on a collision course with one of America’s top killers — type 2 diabetes.

--Don’t Ignore Your Snore

A new study published in the journal Sleep Medicine collected sleep study data on 1,453 people. Their average age of the participants was 63 years and none of them had diabetes at the beginning of the study.

Participants were separated into four different groups based on their sleep study results — normal sleepers or having mild, moderate or severe sleep apnea. After a 13-year study period, the researchers found that 285 folks developed Type 2 diabetes.

But what was more surprising…

The study revealed that sleep apnea could increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by a whopping 70 percent!

And this wasn’t the first study to find a connection between sleep apnea and diabetes. Experts recommend that folks who have diabetes be screened for sleep apnea and vice versa — especially if you snore.

Snoring isn’t the only clue that you may suffer from sleep apnea. Other symptoms include daytime tiredness, morning headaches, irritability and sudden awakenings followed by a shortness of breath.

There are treatments like continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) that can make a big difference in controlling sleep apnea. Some doctors also recommend elevating the head of your bed to reduce snoring and open airways.

In addition, obesity increases your risk of developing both sleep apnea and diabetes. So get out this weekend and take a walk. This will help you keep a healthy weight, which is a great step to take if you want to avoid either condition.

Live well,

Natalie Moore
Managing editor, Living Well Daily


Sources

[1] Obstructive sleep apnea and incident type 2 diabetes

The post Are You Getting Diabetes… in Your Sleep?!? appeared first on Laissez Faire.

Report abuse

Comments

Your Comments
Question   Razz  Sad   Evil  Exclaim  Smile  Redface  Biggrin  Surprised  Eek   Confused   Cool  LOL   Mad   Twisted  Rolleyes   Wink  Idea  Arrow  Neutral  Cry   Mr. Green

Top Stories
Recent Stories

Register

Newsletter

Email this story
Email this story

If you really want to ban this commenter, please write down the reason:

If you really want to disable all recommended stories, click on OK button. After that, you will be redirect to your options page.